Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Isaac Knapp or search for Isaac Knapp in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 1: the Boston mob (second stage).—1835. (search)
turns to England. Garrison's partnership with Knapp ends. It was now time for Mr. Garrison to de evening, several of my friends Among them Knapp, Whittier, and A. Bronson Alcott and his wife, went forth into the city to look after friend Knapp. He was about the city yesterday, but I coulderty, the owners of the building have notified Knapp to quit; and as he has no lease he must do so.l. Article second: Stick and Hang. Isaac Knapp to W. L. Garrison. Boston, October 26, 183r all excepting yourself and Brother Knapp. Knapp was still an inmate of the Garrisons'; and Hen at Brooklyn, I shall be always ready to aid Mr. Knapp as far as I can in the publication of the Liy may expose you. W. L. Garrison to Isaac Knapp. Brooklyn, Conn., October 28, 1835. Ms. the journey, needlessly. . . . I wish bro. Knapp to take special care of all the pieces I Isaachatted a little with brother Henry and friend Knapp, then read the last Liberator, I have Dec. 26[11 more...]
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 2: Germs of contention among brethren.—1836. (search)
he Liberator had ended in 1835 in Garrison and Knapp Lib. 6.3, 191, 199. dissolving their partnerso each of the subscribers, in behalf of friend Knapp and myself. . . . If we can get along withoher friend K. has got into his new office. Isaac Knapp. Tell him to make everything else give way nd then Jan. 20, 1836. hand it over to friend Knapp for publication in the Liberator. The Scripman's, having first seen bro. Henry and friend Knapp, whom I found to be in good Henry Benson. d them. Saturday night March 5. I slept with Knapp and Henry in the office, and had as Henry BeLegislature of Massachusetts, etc. (Boston: Isaac Knapp, 1836). Since he left, our Society sent in ns, Miss Chapman, Mr. Sewall, Mr. Southwick, Mr. Knapp, Mr. Kimball, Mr. Fairbanks, &c., were presecly reported me on the sick list, he writes to Knapp from Brooklyn, July 19, 1836, you may now say is, the insertion of a Ms. communication by Knapp, (written by friend Oakes William Oakes, of
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
er societies (Official circular). The paper, however, is not to be the organ of our Society, nor is anybody to control my pen. This arrangement will relieve friend Knapp and myself of a heavy burden, which has long crushed us to the earth. It is probable that we shall soon enlarge the paper. This enlargement was made with the in which he was perhaps the most debilitated, from his old scrofulous trouble. But his heart was light for the encounter: What is in the wind now he writes to Knapp from Ms. Aug. 9, 1837. Brooklyn. Only think of a public clerical admonition! Do not ecclesiastical terrors take hold of you, as publisher of the Liberatorte and publish. We are to have a Board meeting on Monday, expressly on this point; and what August 28. will be the result, I can hardly predict. Probably friend Knapp and myself will have to resume the pecuniary responsibilities of the paper, but these will probably be met by some of our brethren. If not, the paper cannot be su
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
was published with the signatures of the old partners, Garrison and Knapp, in the Liberator of December 15, 1837. Despite its length, the gr, W. L. G. to F. Jackson. Boston, Printed in pamphlet form by Isaac Knapp. prepared at a week's notice from the Massachusetts Board, whichan was the annually recurring deficit in the Liberator's accounts. Knapp's management of the publication had as usual been most unbusinessli co-proprietor of the paper depicts his state of mind: Isaac Knapp to W. L. Garrison, at Brooklyn. Boston, September 12, 1838. Msh to remember me to all the family. Ever, unalterably, yours, Isaac Knapp. Pity prevailed in the end, and an agreement for Lib. 8.199, 207. Knapp's and Mr. Garrison's support was entered into by Francis Jackson, Edmund Quincy, and William Bassett, acting as a committee to supervise the finances of the Liberator. Knapp was allowed to continue to print the paper on the terms indicated by himself, and with some con
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 5: shall the Liberator lead—1839. (search)
soon as he read it in the Anti-Slavery Office, Knapp says anger reddened his face, his lips quivereaken possession of his breast. He told friend Knapp, the other day, that if I had declared at the Feb. 24, 1839. It is the intention of friend Knapp to print it also, in pamphlet form. Boyle oughe large circulation of the Cradle of Liberty. Knapp, it was presently announced, had relinquished partner, was appointed to confer with Mr. Knapp, in order to effect the desired arrangement he referees, (who were all quite friendly to Mr. Knapp), they summoned a number of practical printrmine the amount that ought to be awarded to Mr. Knapp. On being asked, of what pecuniary value a uity, the referees decided that I should pay Mr. Knapp $150—half of it to be paid yearly. This decart. To say that I separated from my friend Knapp with great reluctance and pain of mind—that I lly got our Ms. arrangements made with friend Knapp. The committee of reference awarded him $175—[1 more...
s to G., 1.290, 319, 322, 326, 327, 429, 430, I. Knapp, 1.327, Clarkson, 1.363, B. C Bacon, 1.468; f 55; friendship with W. G. Crocker, 55, 56, Isaac Knapp, 56; Fourth of July oration before Franklin Cushing's candidacy, 72; walks to Boston with Knapp, 72, removes thither, 73; caucus speech for Otish Liberator in Boston, 217; partnership with Knapp, 218 (1830) —Issues No. 1 of Liberator, 1.219,rage, 270, Masonry, 271; tributes to Lundy and Knapp, 272, S. J. May, 273; secures Henry Benson as thday sonnet, 72 (1835)——Ends partnership with Knapp, 2.66, 84; labors with R. I. Legislature, 76; , 329; removes to Cambridgeport, 329; buys out Knapp, 331, 332(1839)——Key to G.'s opposition to Thi1.124; O. Johnson, 1.204, 221, 267, 272, 280; I. Knapp, 1.340, 341, 515, :44, 107, 138; Liberator, 198; Abby Kelley, 2.59, 174; J. Kenrick, 1.49; I. Knapp, 2.40, 255; E. G. Loring, 2.55; B. Lundy, 1.9.'s address to colored people, 334.—Letter to I. Knapp, 1.334.—See J. McCrummell. Hoby, J., Rev., var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? "https://ssl." : "http://www."); document.write(unescape("%3Cscript src='" + gaJsHost + "google-analytics.com/ga.js' type='text/javascript'%3E%3C/script%3E"));