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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for Samuel L. Knapp or search for Samuel L. Knapp in all documents.

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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Preface (search)
predecessors; the latest, that he has many. It is a pleasure to remember Samuel L. Knapp, who in the preface to his Lectures on American literature, published in 1erently ;--and the editors of the present work are at this point in accord with Knapp. Knapp, however, illustrates a temptation which has beset investigators of AKnapp, however, illustrates a temptation which has beset investigators of American literature from his day to ours, namely, the temptation to relinquish the unremunerative project of adequate scholarly publication and to compensate oneself t. A second temptation of the American historian, which appeared long before Knapp and persisted long after him, is to magnify the achievements of one's own parisralding the dawn of a genuinely native school of poetry. Our pioneer historian Knapp discreetly hesitates to say whether she of the banks of the Connecticut [Mrs. Sto her tuneful sisters, Hemans and Landon, on the other side of the water. But Knapp, who is a forward-looking man, anticipates the spirit of most of our ante-bellu
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 3: early essayists (search)
rks of Yankee homespun with Addisonian finery. During the first decade of the nineteenth century nearly every literary device and favourite character in the long line of British essayists was reproduced in this country. Isaac Bickerstaff owned an American cousin in Launcelot Langstaff of Salmagundi, memories of l'espion turc were evoked by Wirt's Letters of a British spy, and Goldsmith's Lien Chi Altangi dropped a small corner of his mantle on Irving's Mustapha Ruba-Dub Kheli Khan and S. L. Knapp's Shahcoolen. The shade of Johnson dictated the titles of The traveller, the rural Wanderer, The Saunterer, and The Loiterer, and such editorial pseudonyms as Jonathan Oldstyle, Oliver Oldschool, and John Oldbug were significant of the attempt to catch the literary tone of the previous age. But the essay of manners, a product of leisurely urban life, was not easily adapted to the environment of a sparsely settled, bustling young republic. Perhaps, indeed, wrote the Rev. David Graham of