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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 2, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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hich certain Union men in Danbury determined to take down. Some thirty or forty of them, therefore, repaired to the location of the obnoxious rag, taking an American flag with them to put in its place. They surrounded the pole for this purpose, when they were attacked by a party of tories, some two hundred strong, and a general fight ensued, the weapons being spades, axes, and clubs. Being soon overpowered, though not till after a hard fight, the Union men fled, carrying away with them Andrew Knox, John Allen, and Thomas Kinney, of their party, all very badly cut about the head with spades. The first blow struck was by a peace man, who inflicted a fearful blow upon one of the above. Of the tories two were probably fatally wounded, (one report, and apparently authenticated, states that the first one named is dead, and the other beyond recovery,) named Abraham Wildman and----Gorham. The Union men of course returned home to Danbury, and the peace flag still waves. It may be ment
teele and Tiernon are also worthy of especial mention for their gallantry. I would also mention the name of Corporal Sullivan, of Co. E, who, in the midst of a galling fire, went across the front of the enemy's batteries and returned with water to the wounded. Of the portion of the regiment under the command of Major Burke, that officer makes honorable mention of the names of Capt. H. M. Hard, Co. J; Capt. Robinson, Co. K; Capt. Hudson and Lieut. Hickly, Co. C; Capt. Moore, Co. D; Sergeant-Major Knox; and Chaplain W. T. O'Higgins. I beg leave to enclose a list of the killed and wounded of the command, all of which, is respectfully submitted. W. H. Lytle, Col. Tenth Ohio Regiment U. S. A. Col. Smith's report. Headquarters Thirteenth regiment O. V. I. Camp Scott, Va., Sept. 11th, 1861. Lieut. J. O. Stanage, A. A. A.-Gen.: sir: I have the honor to submit the following statement of the part taken by my regiment in the action near Connifex Ferry yesterday. At about e
ide, about five miles above Columbus by land. Information of it was immediately brought in by the pickets of Tappan's regiment, encamped opposite Columbus, and communicated to General Polk, who immediately began preparations to send reinforcements to Tappan, steam having to be raised for the transportation of the troops across the river. In the mean time the enemy came down at double-quick, and attacked Tappan's regiment, which had to fall back; when Pillow arrived with Pickett's, Wright's, Knox's, Walker's, and Freeman's regiments, and gave the enemy battle in an open square of about 700 acres, on which the trees had been felled, the Federals being concealed in the surrounding woods and brushes. Our troops fought here at a great disadvantage, being exposed to the fire of the skulking Federals without having a fair chance at them, but yet they made a gallant struggle, until, their ammunition running out, they were compelled to return to the river. The Federals then fell upon Tapp
ide, about five miles above Columbus by land. Information of it was immediately brought in by the pickets of Tappan's regiment, encamped opposite Columbus, and communicated to General Polk, who immediately began preparations to send reinforcements to Tappan, steam having to be raised for the transportation of the troops across the river. In the mean time the enemy came down at double-quick, and attacked Tappan's regiment, which had to fall back; when Pillow arrived with Pickett's, Wright's, Knox's, Walker's, and Freeman's regiments, and gave the enemy battle in an open square of about 700 acres, on which the trees had been felled, the Federals being concealed in the surrounding woods and brushes. Our troops fought here at a great disadvantage, being exposed to the fire of the skulking Federals without having a fair chance at them, but yet they made a gallant struggle, until, their ammunition running out, they were compelled to return to the river. The Federals then fell upon Tapp
which certain Union men in Danbury determined to take down. Some thirty or forty of them, therefore, repaired to the location of the obnoxious rag, taking an American flag with them to put in its place. They surrounded the pole for this purpose, when they were attacked by a party of tories, some two hundred strong, and a general fight ensued, the weapons being spades, axes and clubs. Being soon overpowered, though not till after a hard fight, the Union men fled, carrying away with them Andrew Knox, John Allen and Thomas Kinney, of their party, all very badly cut about the head with spades. The first blow struck was by a "peace" man, who inflicted a fearful blow upon one of the above Of the tories two were probably fatally wounded, (one report, and apparently authenticated, states that the first one named is dead, and the other beyond recovery,) named Abraham Wildman and — Gorham. The Union men of course returned home to Danbury, and the "peace" flag still waves. It may be me