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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of the companies. (search)
nry Charles, R. H. Chisholm, David Clark, D. W. Clark, Wildie Clark, Wm. Clem, William Craig, John Daniel, F. M. Dority, John Dority, Samuel Dority, Wm. Dority, John Dougherty, died in Camp Douglas, October 2, 1864, of pneumonia; Charles B. Ecton, now a member of the Kentucky Senate; Casswell Epperson, John Fields, Wm. French, John Goode, John Gruelle, deserted October, 1862, and joined the Federal Army; Michael Haggard, Robert Hogan, Joe S. Hood, Henry Hugeley, James Hugeley, John Jones, Robert Knox, died in Camp Douglas, October 21, 1864, of chronic diarrhoea; David Larison, Robert Lawrence, George Leslie, James Logan, Alfred Martin, Elisha Ogden, Thomas Parris, Archie Piersall, J. H. Reed, promoted to assistant quartermaster sergeant; John Shay, Willis F. Spahr, promoted to quartermaster sergeant; John Stivers, F. M. Stone, Raleigh Sutherland, regimental farrier; T. B. Stuart, John Tate, Wm. Tate, Wm. Taylor, Obadiah B. Tracy, died in Camp Douglas, February 17, 1864, of chronic dia
the fifty-seventh anniversary of that sanguinary battle. There is some mistake in the statement about Mr. Hunt's services on that occasion. The responsible pilot who took the Chesapeake out, and left her six leagues below the lighthouse, was Robert Knox. Mr. Hunt, then twenty-two years old, may have been with him, as an assistant or apprentice. Although young at the time, living near the scene of action, I well remember the exciting events of that day. The action took place on a beautiful, and the air was full of rumors. It was only too certain that a sharp, desperate fight had taken place, and that both frigates had sailed out of the harbor, instead of coming in. The next day, to calm the public mind, Com. Bainbridge requested Mr. Knox, the pilot, to publish a statement of what he saw after leaving the Chesapeake, but it gave no satisfaction. No action in the war of 1812 occasioned greater mortification to Americans, or more exultation in England. Capt. Broke was welcomed
Keniston, 256, 266 Kennedy, 111, 113-15, 121, 263, 266, 267 Kennison, 71 Kenny and Kenney, 344, 347, 349, 361 Kenrick, 165 Kent, 137, 183, 187, 203, 208, 257, 258, 267 Keough, 341 Kern, 164, 173 Kerrigan, 343 Kettell and Kettle, 58, 267 Keyes, 173,177, 267,271, 349 Kidder, 20, 273 Kimball, 223, 321 King, 63, 66, 114, 115, 216, 267, 333, 348 King Charles II, 9 King George III., 51, 63, 87 King James I., 33 Kneeland, 34, 104 Knight, 53 Knox, 108, 134, 135 Kossuth, 139 Ladd, 346 Lafayette, 139 Lairson, 348 Laiton, 224 Lamson, 63, 83, 96, 267 Lane, 112, 140, 154, 158, 159, 170, 171, 210, 267, 346 Lang, 349 Langdon, 66, 185 Laughton, 328 Lawrence, 97, 134, 135, 221, 232, 263, 267, 340 Leach, 197, 248, 267, 298, 299, 306, 307 Learned, 141, 267, 271, 274, 281 Leathers, 267 Lee, 59, 60, 100 Lefevre, 267 Lemmon, 267 Lennon. 340. 341 Lewis, 18, 71, 268, 280, 348 Libby and Libbey,