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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for J. C. P. Krafft or search for J. C. P. Krafft in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 10: naval engagement at South-West pass.--the Gulf blockading squadron in November, 1861. (search)
onotonous; and if not as brilliant as that performed by the Navy in other localities, it performed its share of the work of putting down the rebellion by maintaining the blockade of the Southern Coast, the most severe duty performed by any officers during the war. Gulf Squadron, 1861, vessels and officers. Note.--Names of officers obtained mostly from Navy Register of August 31, 1861. Flagship Niagara. Captain Wm. W. McKean, Flag Officer; Lieuts., John Guest, Wm. F. Spicer, J. C. P. De Krafft, Robt. L. May and Edw. E. Potter; Fleet Surg., G. R. B. Horner; Surgeon, J. Foltz; Asst. Surg., James McAllister; Chaplain, C. S. Stewart; Paymaster, G. B. Barry; Masters, J. D. Marvin, James O'Kane, T. L. Swan, H. B. Robeson and Silas Casey, Jr.; Capt. Marines, Josiah Watson; First Lieut., Geo. Butler; Chief Engineer, Robt. H. Long; Asst.-Engineers, D. B. Macomb, C. B. Kidd, E. A. C. DuPlaine, L. R. Green, R. H. Grinnell, A. H. Fisher and Robt. Potts; Boatswain, A. M. Pomeroy; Gunner,
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
se troops were promised without hesitation on the 8th of July, in an interview held on board the Hartford, between the Admiral and Generals Canby and Granger; but circumstances soon obliged General Canby to say that he could only spare troops enough to invest one fort. Farragut then suggested that it should be Fort Gaines, and engaged at the same time to have a naval force in the Sounds ready to protect the landing of the Army on Dauphine Island, in the rear of the fort. Lieutenant-Commander J. C. P. De Krafft, in the Conemaugh, was assigned to this duty. It was arranged between Farragut and General Granger that the attack should take place on the 4th day of August, but owing to unforeseen circumstances it was delayed until the 5th. This delay turned out to be fortunate, for on the 4th the Confederates were engaged in throwing more troops and supplies into Fort Gaines, all of which were captured. At 5:40 A. M. on the 5th of August, 1864, all the vessels outside of the bar,