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The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 3. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Anti-Slavery Poems (search)
man no more shall kneel, And God alone be Lord! 1832. Toussaint L'ouverture. Toussaint L'Ouverture, the black chieftain of Hayti, was a slave on the plantation de Libertas, belonging to Meservation of his life was owing to the negro's gratitude for this kindness. In 1797, Toussaint L'Ouverture was appointed, by the French government, General-in-Chief of the armies of St. Domingo, ery by Columbus, could not boast of a single name which deserves comparison with that of Toussaint L'Ouverture. Twas night. The tranquil moonlight smile With which Heaven dreams of Earth, shed downumble door, Listening, with half-suspended breath, To the wild sounds of fear and death, Toussaint L'Ouverture! What marvel that his heart beat high! The blow for freedom had been given, And blood haader may, perhaps, call to mind the beautiful sonnet of William Wordsworth, addressed to Toussaint L'Ouverture, during his confinement in France. “Toussaint!—thou most unhappy man of men! Whether t
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 3. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Notes (search)
Notes Note 1, page 18. The reader may, perhaps, call to mind the beautiful sonnet of William Wordsworth, addressed to Toussaint L'Ouverture, during his confinement in France. “Toussaint!—thou most unhappy man of men! Whether the whistling rustic tends his plough Within thy hearing, or thou liest now Buried in some deep dungeon's earless den; O miserable chieftain—where and when Wilt thou find patience?—Yet, die not, do thou Wear rather in thy bonds a cheerful brow; Though fallen thyself, never to rise again, Live and take comfort. Thou hast left behind Powers that will work for thee; air, earth, and skies,— There's not a breathing of the common wind That will forget thee; thou hast great allies. Thy friends are exultations, agonies, And love, and man's unconquerable mind.” Note 2, page 67. The Northern author of the Congressional rule against receiving petitions of the people on the subject of Slavery. Note 3, page 88. There was at the time when this poem was writ