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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 56 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 24 8 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 24 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, The Life and Times of Charles Sumner: His Boyhood, Education and Public Career. 10 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 9 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Lafayette or search for Lafayette in all documents.

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William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1, Chapter 15: Bay of San Francisco. (search)
wept from Belmont Hill. The lordship of this inland sea is written on her face, as plainly as the legend on a map. The villages of saintly names, San Rafael, Santa Clara, San Leandro, and the rest, all nestle near the water's edge, while on the higher grounds, among the creeks and caions, nearly all the settlements have English names. Searsville, Crystal Springs, and School House Station, cover Santa Clara, San Mateo, and San Bruno on these western heights, while Dublin, Danville, and Lafayette cover San Lorenzo, San Antonio, and San Pablo on those eastern heights. White settlers seize the water edges in all places where a pier is wanted or a factory can be built. They clasp the Bay in railway lines, adorn the tide with sailing ships, pollute the shore with smoking chimneys, bridge the narrows with ferry boats. Where water pays, they hug the shore, defying chills and fevers for the sake of gain ; but these White settlers never linger in the swamps, like Mexicans and Half-breed