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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 18 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar or search for Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar in all documents.

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one of the most notable orations ever delivered in the House of Representatives. Charles Sumner, it will be remembered, had been foremost among the leaders in the negro legislation of Congress. Yet it was on the death of Charles Sumner that L. Q. C. Lamar, congressman from Mississippi, melted the members Lucius Q C. Lamar in 1879 Taken only five years after his Eulogy of Sumner, this photograph preserves the noble features of Lamar as he stood before the House of Representatives in 187hall be peace. . . . The war is over; its results are fixed; its passions are dead, and its heroism and sacrifices have bound this people together as they were never bound before. It was, then, no exaggeration for that eminent Mississippian, L. Q. C. Lamar, in his oration at Charleston, the center of secession, at the unveiling of the statue of Calhoun, the apostle of States' rights, to declare that the appeal to arms in 1861 guaranteed and established the indissolubility of the American Union
Senator Charles Sumner of Massachusetts had died March 11, 1874, and the House followed the Senate in paying respect to his memory by suspending business. Lucius Q. C. Lamar, Congressman from Mississippi, was invited by the Massachusetts delegation to second the resolution. Only a perfunctory performance was expected, but as Lan tones which should reach each and every heart throughout this broad territory: My countrymen! know one another, and you will love one another. Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar. The new South Delivered before the New England Society of New York City at the dinner of December 22, 1886. in response to an urgent invithile other minds were occupying themselves with different theories of reconstruction.: a scene contemporary with sumner's uncompromising resolution, referred to by Lamar His trade destroyed—illustrations for Grady's words Southern express office, Richmond Mill on James river and Kanawha canal Gallego flour mill