hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 28 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 12 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment 12 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 6 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country. You can also browse the collection for Charles Lamb or search for Charles Lamb in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country, Snow (search)
t besieges the portal, creeps in beneath it and above it, and on every latch and key-handle lodges an advanced guard of white rime. Leave the door ajar never so slightly, and a chill creeps in cat-like; we are conscious by the warmest fireside of the near vicinity of cold, its fingers are feeling after us, and even if they do not clutch us, we know that they are there. The sensations of such days almost make us associate their clearness and whiteness with something malignant and evil. Charles Lamb asserts of snow, It glares too much for an innocent color, methinks. Why does popular mythology associate the infernal regions with a high temperature instead of a low one? El Aishi, the Arab writer, says of the bleak wind of the Desert (so writes Richardson, the African traveller), The north wind blows with an intensity equalling the cold of hell; language fails me to describe its rigorous temperature. Some have thought that there is a similar allusion in the phrase, weeping and gnash