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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 26 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 13 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 12 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 10 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 5, 1863., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 24, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 2 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 6 2 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 5 1 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Lander or search for Lander in all documents.

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th stones and earth from a trench outside. General McClellan, after reconnoitring their position, sent General Rosecrans with the Eighth, Tenth, and Fifteenth Indiana Regiments, the Nineteenth Ohio and the Cincinnati cavalry, to get in their rear. I went with him as guide. We started about daylight, having first taken something to eat, (but got nothing more until six o'clock next night, when some of them got a little beef,) and turned into the woods on our right. I led, accompanied by Col. Lander, through a pathless route in the woods by which I had made my escape about four weeks before. We pushed along through the bush, laurel, and rocks, followed by the whole division in perfect silence. The bushes wetted us thoroughly, and it was very cold. Our circuit was about five miles. About noon we reached the top of the mountain, near my father's farm. It was not intended that the enemy should know of our movements; but a dragoon with despatches from General McClellan, who was sent
nd Tenth Indiana Regiments, with the Nineteenth Ohio, to go around along the top of the mountain, to get upon the east side of the intrenchments, so as to surround the enemy. After going nine miles, through woods and over rocks, a march which Col. Lander, who was along, says is without an equal. Gen. Rosecrans came out upon the intrenchments at the top of the hill. They received a fire from the two guns, (six-pounders,) which killed one man and wounded several. Immediately Col. Lander calleCol. Lander called for twenty sharp-shooters, and with them hurried forward and placed themselves behind some rocks. These brave fellows soon picked off the gunners, but they were reinforced. The Nineteenth Ohio boys, who were in the rear and on high ground, fired a whole volley, after which the Indiana troops charged the guns and carried them, and in a moment the whole intrenchment, and utterly routed the enemy. The action was short but fierce. Two hundred and forty of the rebels have been found killed, an