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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for J. J. Landrum or search for J. J. Landrum in all documents.

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., and found a special train and order from Col. Landrum to the Lieutenant-Colonel of the Eighteenthvery little while we received an order from Col. Landrum to come and defend a bridge leading into toval at Cynthiana, we were well cared for by Col. Landrum, Acting Commissary Ware, and the citizens gless. This difficulty was also remedied by Col. Landrum, who gave us some twenty good muskets. Thebefore the men were formed to start, when Colonel Landrum sent an aid to me, countermanding the ordouth side of tho river. I was ordered by Colonel Landrum to post a company above the bridge, one oaw recruits. Great praise is due Lieutenant-Colonel J. J. Landrum for his coolness and bravery. h. Our forces were under command of Lieut.-Col. J. J. Landrum and Major William O. Smith, who show manifested bravery and determination, were Col. Landrum, Major Smith, Capt. Robert Scott, Capt. W. there received a despatch to report to Lieut.-Col. Landrum, Cynthiana, where we arrived at nine A.[3 more...]
ptains Baldwin, Stacy and Kendrick, of your staff, some of whom had travelled twenty-five miles after hearing the cannonading of the morning, for valuable aid given me during the second and third engagements. Colonels Lucas, Link, Mahan, Korff, Landrum, Oden, Munday, McMillan, Majors Kempton, Orr, Morrison, Captain Baird, Lieut. Lamphere, and Sergeant Brown, of the battery, greatly distinguished themselves during the action, together with other officers whose names I have not got. The enemy with his staff was here. With most of those engaged, as well as myself, it was our first battle. As we stood here under the trees I could notice a stillness, an unwonted stillness, among such numbers of men only broken by the thunders of Lieutenant Landrum's guns, or as the rebel shells with fiend-like scream came crashing through the trees. One exploded to the right of the road, another before us; one would miss a hundred yards, the next, perhaps, come very near. Low-toned commands were gi
ptains Baldwin, Stacy and Kendrick, of your staff, some of whom had travelled twenty-five miles after hearing the cannonading of the morning, for valuable aid given me during the second and third engagements. Colonels Lucas, Link, Mahan, Korff, Landrum, Oden, Munday, McMillan, Majors Kempton, Orr, Morrison, Captain Baird, Lieut. Lamphere, and Sergeant Brown, of the battery, greatly distinguished themselves during the action, together with other officers whose names I have not got. The enemy with his staff was here. With most of those engaged, as well as myself, it was our first battle. As we stood here under the trees I could notice a stillness, an unwonted stillness, among such numbers of men only broken by the thunders of Lieutenant Landrum's guns, or as the rebel shells with fiend-like scream came crashing through the trees. One exploded to the right of the road, another before us; one would miss a hundred yards, the next, perhaps, come very near. Low-toned commands were gi
undersigned took the cars on the Central Kentucky Railroad, from the depot in Covington, with about one hundred men for Cynthiana, Kentucky, at which place Lieut.-Col. Landrum, of the Eighteenth Kentucky, was in command. Receiving orders to move towards Paris, and distribute my force at the different stations, to guard bridges, Iorted that John Morgan, with a force of from one thousand to one thousand two hundred men, was moving down the road to Cynthiana. I immediately telegraphed Lieut.-Col. Landrum, at Cynthiana, of Morgan's movements, and his advance on that place. I also sent a message to Capt. Ayres, commanding the brigade guards, between Paris and Lexington all the men I could spare. Satisfied that I could not weaken my force, I did not send any men to Lexington. About seven o'clock in the evening, Lieut.-Col. Landrum reported the fall of Cynthiana. Upon consultation, it was deemed advisable to fall back on Lexington. We moved at eleven o'clock that night, and proceeded