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votes. He fell off on the thirty-sixth to 151 1/2, which vote he continued to receive up to the fifty-seventh ballot, on which Guthrie received 65 1/2, Hunter 16, Lane 14, Dickinson 4, and Jefferson Davis 1. The Convention (May 3d), on motion of Mr. Russell, of Virginia, by a vote of 195 to 55, adjourned, to reassemble at Baltimow proceeded to ballot for a candidate for President, when John C. Breckinridge, of Kentucky, received the unanimous vote--105--of the delegates present; and Gen. Joseph Lane, of Oregon, was nominated for Vice-President by a similar vote. And then, after a speech from Mr. Yancey, the Convention finally adjourned. The Constituanks of each anti-Republican party. Thus, in New York, the Fusion anti-Lincoln ticket was made up of ten supporters of Bell and Everett, seven of Breckinridge and Lane, and the residue friends of Douglas. No doubt, there was an understanding among the managers that, if all these could elect Mr. Douglas, their votes should be cas
d others, strenuously objected to a consideration of the majority report at this time; so that its second reading was postponed until next day: when, on motion of Mr. Douglas, it was made the special order for noon of the day following; when Gen. Joseph Lane, of Oregon, made a long speech against coercion, and in favor of the Southern view of State Rights. Mr. Andrew Johnson, of Tennessee, followed, speaking very strongly and earnestly in favor of maintaining the Union. At length, the Senat by the following vote: Yeas--Messrs. Crittenden, Douglas, Harlan, Johnson, of Tennessee, Kennedy, Morrill, and Thomson-7. Nays--Messrs. Bayard, Bigler, Bingham, Bright, Chandler, Clark, Dixon, Fessenden, Foot, Foster, Grimes, Gwin, Hunter, Lane, Latham, Mason, Nicholson, Polk, Pugh, Rice, Sebastian, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wigfall, Wilkinson, and Wilson--28. So the Senate, by four to one, disposed of the scheme of the Peace Commissioners, and proceeded to vote, directly the
A story is told of Senator Joseph Lane, of Oregon, which will bear repetition. Accounts of the Senator's rebel sentiments and movements preceded his return home, and, it is said, rendered him very unpopular, particularly after the attack on Fort Sumter. When he reached the shores of the Pacific, he began to feel his unpopularity in various ways; but no remark that was made to him and in his hearing was more cutting than that of a stage-driver with whom he had entered into conversation witfic, he began to feel his unpopularity in various ways; but no remark that was made to him and in his hearing was more cutting than that of a stage-driver with whom he had entered into conversation without disclosing his name. In the course of his talk the Senator took occasion to remark that he considered himself the worst-abused man in the State. Well, I don't know about that, replied the driver; if you are any worse abused than that rascal, Jo. Lane, God help you. --Phila. Press, July 11.
How the Oregonians Respond to Jo. Lane.--The following resolutions were passed at a late Union meeting, composed of all political parties, at Portland, Oregon:-- Resolved, That we alone owe allegiance to the Government of the United States, and unqualifiedly pledge ourselves to its support and protection. Resolved, That the crisis in our national affairs has rendered obsolete party issues, and blotted out the existence of political parties. Resolved, That we recognize only the existence of a Union and a disunion party, and that he who is for the Union is our partisan, and that the Constitution is our platform. Resolved, That, at a time when the country is resisting with all its might a war of invasion and destruction, indifference is impossible to the patriot, and neutrality is cowardice.--Louisville Journal, July 10.
Letter from United States Senator Lane.--We have great pleasure in publishing the following letter from that brilliant statesman, the Hon. Joseph Lane, of Oregon. It may seem somewhat paradoxical that a Pacific statesman should be ferociously wathe Hon. Joseph Lane, of Oregon. It may seem somewhat paradoxical that a Pacific statesman should be ferociously warlike, but that is evidently none of our business. We cannot comply with Mr. Lane's request in regard to hoisting the Palmetto flag, but we will say that we admire his (we allude to Mr. Lane, and not the flag, of course) boldness, candor, and eloqueMr. Lane's request in regard to hoisting the Palmetto flag, but we will say that we admire his (we allude to Mr. Lane, and not the flag, of course) boldness, candor, and eloquence: Senit Chambir, Washington, March the third, 1860 onct. Eds. Vannurty Faire--if god spairs my live I shall seeseed with in 20 dase. jonson of tennysea is fernenst me, but he haint got no intellect into him. Siyil war is sertin & I wantMr. Lane, and not the flag, of course) boldness, candor, and eloquence: Senit Chambir, Washington, March the third, 1860 onct. Eds. Vannurty Faire--if god spairs my live I shall seeseed with in 20 dase. jonson of tennysea is fernenst me, but he haint got no intellect into him. Siyil war is sertin & I wants to here the Kannin Rore. Hist the Palmettoe banner from on top your offiis & let it waive to the Brees. Don't mucillate this mannerscript and be particular not to maike no Misstaiks in the spellin and punktooate it proper, amerykan Staitsmen suff
The Richmond Whig says that the last reliable intelligence represents that Old Abe had been beastly intoxicated for the previous thirty-six consecutive hours, and that eighty Border Ruffians, from Kansas, under the command of Lane, occupied the East Room to guard His Majesty's slumbers. It is broadly hinted in a Washington paper, that his guard exerts a despotic control over the Presidential inmate — that all his decrees are of its inspiration. The paper (The States and Union) then proceeds to shed a becoming quantity of tears over this sad subject for contemplation. --N. O. Sunday Delta, April 28.
Knights of the Golden Circle, D. 94 Knoxville, Ky., riot at, D. 69 Koch, Ignatz, Doc. 108 L Ladd, Luther C., killed at Baltimore, D. 53 Lafayette, Ind., first troops left, D. 29 Laisser, Aller, P. 13 Lake Borgne, La., D. 95 Lamon, —, Col., his interview with Gov. Pickens and Beauregard, D. 20 Lander, —, Col., at Philippi, Va., Doc. 335 Land of the South, P. 108 Lane, Joseph H., appointed Brig.-Gen. in the U. S. A., D. 105 Lane, Joseph, his orthography, P. 24 Lang, Louis, D. 56 Latham, —, Senator, D. 66 Latham, G. R., Doc. 328 Law and Order.--in the North and in the South, P. 49 Law, George, letter to the President of the U. S., D. 43; Doc. 147 Lawrence, George W., D. 60 Lawrence, Mass., Union meeting, D. 25; war contributions of, D. 28 Lawrence, —, Col., D. 38 Lawyers — meeting of the Bar of New York, Doc. 135; New Orleans Bar in arms, P. 54 Leavenworth, E. W., wife
esident of which was the Hon. Caleb Cushing of Massachusetts) on the first ballot unanimously made choice of John C. Breckinridge of Kentucky, then Vice-President of the United States, for the first office, and with like unanimity selected General Joseph Lane, then a Senator from Oregon, for the second. The resolutions of each of these two conventions denounced the action and policy of the Abolition party, as subversive of the Constitution, and revolutionary in their tendency. Another conveently of the control of Congress; denying the power or duty of Congress to protect the persons or property of individuals or minorities in such territories against the action of majorities. 3. The State-Rights party, supporting Breckinridge and Lane, who held that the territories were open to citizens of all the states, with their property, without any inequality or discrimination, and that it was the duty of the general government to protect both persons and property from aggression in the t
osed by the Congress its contemptuous reception and treatment in the United States Congress failure of last efforts at reconciliation and reunion speech of General Lane of Oregon. While the events which have just been occupying our attention were occurring, the last conspicuous effort was made within the Union to stay the tconciliation and union. In the course of the debate in the Senate on these grave propositions, a manly and eloquent speech was made on March 2, 1861, by the Hon. Joseph Lane, a Senator from Oregon, who had been the candidate of the Democratic state-rights party for the vice-presidency of the United States, in the canvass of 1860. Some passages of this speech seem peculiarly appropriate for insertion here. General Lane was replying to a speech of Andrew Johnson of Tennessee, afterward President of the United States: Mr. President, the Senator from Tennessee complains of my remarks on his speech. He complains of the tone and temper of what I said.
s to be given in the next encounter with the enemy. Bevier, pp. 35, 36. Governor Jackson continued his march toward southwestern Missouri. He had received reliable intelligence that he was pursued by General Lyon from the northeast, and by Lane and Sturgis from the northwest, their supposed object being to form a junction in his rear, and he subsequently learned that a column numbering three thousand had been sent out from St. Louis to intercept his retreat, and had arrived at the town oublic records, and about nine hundred thousand dollars of which the Bank of Lexington had been robbed. General Price caused the money to be at once returned to the bank. After the first day of the siege of Lexington, General Price learned that Lane and Montgomery, from Kansas, with about four thousand men, and General Sturgis, with fifteen hundred cavalry, were on the north side of the Missouri River, advancing to reenforce the garrison at Lexington. At the same time, and from the same dire
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