Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Lane or search for Lane in all documents.

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undy. At the next procession of clubs, now increased in number, the Young Men's Breckinridge and Lane club, with Ernest Lagarde, first president, and his successor in office, Fred Ogden, paraded two on the offenders. The counsel was fatherly, the rebuke mild. The Young Men's Breckinridge and Lane club received this warning from their leaders with respect, shrugged their shoulders on leaving ter could be truthful. This bit of news came to be a triumph for the Young Men's Breckinridge and Lane club. Their enthusiasm had been wiser, had looked more clearly into the future than the prudence apace with its shouts, its bands and transparencies. At the end of September a Breckinridge and Lane mass-meeting was held. The club not only led the van of a monster parade, but marched proudly unry for an independent Confederacy. Over all these—whether Young Bell Ringers or Breckinridge and Lane men, or Douglas and Johnson clubs-hovered a glorified radiance from the Confederacy that was to b
incoln. In his message, Governor Moore made haste to recommend provision for the election of members of the convention as soon as may be passed with due regard to time, to whom shall be communicated the responsibility of determining that position and shaping that policy, so far as affects the relations of Louisiana to the Federal government. Before the legislature met there had come, filtering through, the totals of the Louisiana election. A mere mention suffices here. Breckinridge and Lane had received 22,681 votes; Bell and Everett 20,204; Douglas and Johnson 7,625; Lincoln and Hamlin were voteless. Like Gallio, the supporters of the different candidates now cared for none of these things. The Lincoln election had wiped out, as by an all-spreading sponge, any solicitude for the votes in the various States of the South. With the meeting of the legislature the adjutantgen-eral of the State submitted his report. He looked at the matter gloomily, holding that the sum absolut