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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
t South Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel A. P. Butler. Twelfth South Carolina, Captain R. M. Kerr. Thirteenth South Carolina, Captain D. R. Duncan. Fourteenth South Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel Edward Croft. Orr's Rifles, Major J. T. Robertson. Lane's brigade. actual commanders given as shown by inspection reports. Brigadier-General James H. Lane. Seventh North Carolina, Captain J. G. Harris. Eighteenth North Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel J. W. McGill. Twenty-eighth North Carolina, MaBrigadier-General James H. Lane. Seventh North Carolina, Captain J. G. Harris. Eighteenth North Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel J. W. McGill. Twenty-eighth North Carolina, Major S. N. Stowe. Thirty-third North Carolina, Captain W. J. Callais. Thirty-seventh North Carolina, Colonel W. M. Barbour. Scales's brigade. Brigadier-General Alfred M. Scales. Thirteenth North Carolina, Colonel J. H. Hyman. Sixteenth North Carolina, Colonel W. A. Stowe. Twenty-second North Carolina, T. S. Gallaway. Thirty-fourth North Carolina, Colonel W. L. J. Lowrance. Thirty-eighth, North Carolina, Colonel John Ashford. Heth's division. four Brigadier-Generals reported p
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Further details of the death of General A. P. Hill. (search)
ble, our wagon was packed and sent with all but myself to General Pendleton's headquarters. I remained, fed my mare, and held my position until the enemy were close enough for me to see how many had been shaved Saturday, and then I moved out, receiving as I went cheers or yells from the enemy, for which compliments I did not stop to thank them. When I got down in the bottom I stopped my mare in the branch, and was letting her drink, when General Hill came up, as before stated. I think General Lane will recollect my coming to him later in the day, when he was having a rough time. My Colonel was absent on official business that day, and I was trying to make myself useful. I took a hand in anything that 1 could; carried orders for General R. E. Lee; was sent to General Longstreet, then to Colonel Manning, who was forming a skirmish line (to the south of General Lee's headquarters). Colonel Manning put me in charge of the right (he being in centre), and we had a lively time for some
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph (search)
-third North Carolina, Colonel R. V. Coward. I do not remember why he was absent. I know that he was with me in the battle of Jones's Farm, September 30th, and behaved with conspicuous gallantry on my right flank. Thirty-seventh North Carolina, Colonel William M. Barbour, afterwards mortally wounded in the engagement at Jones's Farm. Please make corrections, if the above are such as you earnestly solicit. With best wishes for you and our Society, I am Yours, very respectfully, James H. Lane. Colonel Z. Davis, of Charleston, S. C., desires the Roster of the Cavalry Corps corrected to read as follows: Butler's Division, Major-General M. C. Butler; Dunevant's Brigade, Brigadier-General John Dunevant; Fourth South Carolina, Colonel B. H. Rutledge; Fifth South Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel R. J. Jeffards; Sixth South Carolina, Colonel H. K. Aiken. The Third South Carolina Cavalry, Colonel Colcock, was never in Virginia, or in Butler's Brigade. General Dunevant was kill
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
additional contributions will be thankfully received, and that if we can be of any service in giving information or conveying funds to the treasury we should be glad for our friends to command us. renewals were never more in order than just now. We have due us, in small sums all over the country, over three thousand dollars, which would be a very small matter to the individual subscribers, but is a very great matter to us. We beg our friends to remit at once. Roster corrections.—General Lane calls attention to the fact that our types in the April number made us change into Coward the name of the gallant Colonel, R. V. Cowan, of the Thirty-Third North Carolina, whose death since the war has been so widely lamented by old comrades and friends. The following makes important corrections in the artillery organization Army of Tennessee, which we take pleasure in publishing: Feagan's, Houston Co., Ga., April 7. 1884. Rev. J. William Jones. Richmond, Va.: Dear Sir,—In review
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sherman's bummers, and some of their work. (search)
m a private letter, written to me, soon after the downfall of the Confederacy, by Captain E. J. Hale, Jr., who was my Assistant-Adjutant General. The Captain is an elegant, educated gentleman, and was as gallant a young officer as ever drew blade in defence of the Lost Cause. As editor of the Fayetteville Observer, which was a power in North Carolina during the war, he is now ably following in the footsteps of his staunch, talented and distinguished father. Yours, very respectfully, James H. Lane. Fayetteville, N. C., July 31st, 1865. my Dear General: It would be impossible to give you an adequate idea of the destruction of property in this good old town. It may not be an average instance, but it is one, the force of whose truth we feel only too fully. My father's property, before the war, was easily convertible into about $85 to $100,000 in specie. He has not now a particle of property which will bring him a dollar of income. His office, with everything in it, was b
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of the Virginia division army of Northern Virginia Association (search)
party, but by some misunderstanding the order did not reach him in time. The movement was made at dark, and resulted in the capture of four pieces, among them one taken from the Federals at First Manassas, from Battery D, of the Fifth artillery. Pendleton was driven back in confusion. At 6.30, next morning, A. P. Hill moved back, and half a mile from Boteler's Ford formed his line of battle in two lines; the first of the brigades of Pender, Gregg and Thomas, under Gregg; and the second, of Lane, Archer and Brocken-brough, under Archer, numbering two thousand muskets. At the same time Porter was pushing forward a reconnoisance in force, under Morell and Sykes, consisting of the First brigade of Morell's division of seven regiments of one thousand seven hundred and eleven men; the Second brigade of Sykes' division of four regiments of one thousand and sixty men; and the Third brigade of Sykes, in the two regiments, and probably five hundred men. Hill advanced on them with spirit in t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A sketch of Debray's Twenty-Sixth regiment of Texas cavalry. (search)
ixth regiment of Texas cavalry, while, according to the date of its organization, it should have been the Tenth or the Eleventh. The organization of the regiment was completed by the promotion of Sergeant R. M. Franklin, of Company D, to the rank of Lieutenant and Adjutant, and the appointment of William Armstrong to be Quartermaster with the rank of Captain. The latter officer, having been transferred to the Engineer Corps, was superseded by Lieutenant T. R. Franklin, of Company D. Lieutenants Lane, of Company B, and Armstrong, of Company F, became the Captains of their respective companies, to fill the vacancies created by the election of Lieutenant-Colonel Myers, and Major Menard. The one-year term of service of Captain Atchison's company having expired, it was replaced in the regiment by Captain Rountree's company, theretofore unattached. Soon after orders were received from the War Department to reduce the companies of cavalry to the number of eighty, rank and file. Few
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Chickamauga. (search)
eld, and Trigg's brigade about three hundred yards in rear of Kelly's, on the prolongation of Bates' brigade, of Stewart's division, which was on the right—thus forming my division in a column of three brigades. A rocky hill near Gracie's right, overlooking the field below, afforded an excellent position for artillery. Upon it I posted Jeffries' battery. The enemy commenced shelling my lines rapidly, and I lost a commissioned officer—killed—and a few men of the Sixth Florida, with Lieutenant Lane and others of the Sixty-Third Tennessee wounded. A shot or two was fired by Jeffries, but I ordered the battery to cease firing, as the distance was too great to assure proper accuracy. My troops remained in ranks without further reply, patiently enduring the fire. About 12 o'clock, in compliance with an order received from Major-General Buckner, I moved my command by the right flank, from about six or eight hundred yards, to a position somewhat west of north from Hunt's field. Trig<