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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 30, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
f the State a strong sentiment against disunion. The vote for presidential candidates in Georgia is a fair criterion of the sentiment in the State prior to the election of Mr. Lincoln. There were three electoral tickets: One for Breckinridge and Lane, one for Bell and Everett, one for Douglas and Johnson, but none for Lincoln and Hamlin. The vote stood as follows: Breckinridge and Lane, 51,893; Bell and Everett, 42,855; Douglas and Johnson, 11,580. As the Breckinridge ticket was favored by tLane, 51,893; Bell and Everett, 42,855; Douglas and Johnson, 11,580. As the Breckinridge ticket was favored by the most pronounced Southern rights men, the vote in Georgia showed a small majority against immediate secession by separate State action. But the election of Mr. Lincoln by a purely sectional vote set the current toward secession, causing the tide of disunion sentiment to rise with steadily increasing volume, and strengthening the views and fears of those who could see relief only by withdrawing from a union which had fallen under the control of a party favoring a policy so antagonistic to the
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
ebb, while Major Mounger was followed by W. M. Jones, J. J. Webb and J. W. Arnold. Adj. A. O. Bacon was succeeded by John Jones. The commissary, J. C. Waddy, was followed by R. J. Cowart, and the quartermaster, J. W. Sutton, by E. P. Watkins. Captain Lane was followed by Gideon J. Norman; Jones by Wm. E. Cleghorn; Hillyer by J. W. Arnold; Webb by T. A. Hurt; Morris by R. P. Wellborn; Beck by S. A. Jemison and Hamp Doles; Hoge by G. G. Gordon and E. A. Sharpe; Mounger by R. A. Hardee, Corker (kial reports. After the battle of Murfreesboro it was united with the Ninth battalion to form the Thirty-seventh regiment. The Twenty-sixth regiment Georgia volunteers when organized had the following field officers: Col. C. W. Styles; Lieut.-Col. W. A. Lane; Maj. Thomas N. Gardner; Adjt. E. N. Atkinson. The captains were G. C. Dent (A), A. S. Atkinson (B), J. C. Nichols (C), D. J. McDonald (D), Eli S. Griffin (E), Wm. H. Dasher (F), Ben F. Mosely (G), Wm. A. McDonald (H), Alexander Atkinson
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
the army of Northern Virginia. The Sumter Flying artillery, under Capt. A. S. Cutts, had won great honor in the affair at Dranesville, and suffered severe loss. The conduct of the brave, true and heroic Cutts, wrote General Stuart, attracted my attention frequently during the action—now serving No. 1, and now as gunner, and still directing and disposing the whole with perfect self-command and a devotion to his duty that was, I believe, scarcely ever equaled. This battery and Hamilton's and Lane's were assigned to the reserve artillery under Colonel Pendleton. In General Magruder's district, the peninsula, the Sixth, Tenth and Sixteenth, under Alfred H. Colquitt, Lafayette McLaws and Howell Cobb, and Cobb's legion under T. R. R. Cobb, well sustained the reputation of the State. McLaws was promoted brigadier-general and assigned to important command, and Colonel Colquitt was given charge of a brigade including the Sixth and Sixteenth. Late in the year the Twenty-third regiment,
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
E. Y. Clark, major, and Thomas E. Winn, adjutant. The Nineteenth battalion Georgia cavalry, Maj. Charles T. Goode, included the companies of Capts. (A) Thaddeus G. Holt, (B) James L. Leath, (C) W. I. Vason, (D) G. R. Coley. The Twentieth battalion Georgia cavalry (partisan rangers) had the following officers: Lieut.-Col. John M. Millen, Maj. S. B. Spencer, Adjt. M. E. Williams, Asst. Quartermaster L. S. Varnedoe; Capts. (A) Moses J. Smith, (B) W. G. Thompson, (C) J. G. Cress, (D) William A. Lane, (E) A. J. Love, (F) J. B. Peacock. This battalion served on the Georgia coast and then in Virginia. In July, 1864, three companies united with seven from the Sixty-second regiment to form the Eighth cavalry. Three others helped to form the Tenth cavalry. Another company, which had been added to the battalion, was placed in the Jeff Davis legion (Mississippi troops). Thomas L. Paine became captain of Company E, and M. E. Williams of Company F. The Twenty-first battalion Georgia ca
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
ly wounded. A few days later, Sergeant Burney was killed by the accidental bursting of a shell. The activity and foresight of Captain Hazzard and the gallantry of Lieutenant Grant and command were mentioned in official orders. On June 11th two steamers and two gunboats, with 300 or 400 men, appeared before Darien, and landing a strong party of negroes burned the town, whose white inhabitants had all left it and were living at a place some distance in the rear, known as the ridge. Capt. W. A. Lane of Company D, Twentieth Georgia battalion of cavalry (Maj. John M. Millen), not having force enough in hand to resist the landing, turned all his attention to the protection of the large number of families and valuable property at the ridge until reinforcements could arrive. The woods surrounding Darien were shelled during the burning of the town. The enemy consisted of negroes under white officers. They captured a pilot boat with sixty bales of cotton on board, and carried off some
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
th great credit. On the 20th, General Gordon was put in command of a division composed of his own brigade, under Evans, and the remnant of the Stonewall division. In the desperate attempt of Grant to break the Confederate lines at Cold Harbor, July 1st and 2d, the Georgians of Longstreet's corps took a prominent and valiant part. Assault after assault was repulsed at Kershaw's salient, with terrible loss to the enemy. The Sumter Eleventh artillery battalion, under Colonel Cutts and Major Lane, consisting of Ross', Patterson's and Wingfield's batteries, did excellent service during this Overland campaign. On the 10th of May, in conjunction with Pegram's battalion of artillery, it repulsed an infantry attack upon the Confederate right at Spottsylvania. Again at Cold Harbor, June 3d, the, Sumter battalion with others materially assisted in checking the enemy's advance. Cabell's battalion, embracing among other batteries the Pulaski and the Troup artillery, also bore a gallant