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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.34 (search)
iciency of the artillery fire, see Meade's Report, August 16th, 1864--Ib., p. 31; Colonel Loring's statement--Ib., p. 95; General Potter, p. 177. Wright, of Halifax, opened too a withering fire from his light guns posted on a hill to the left, nor could he be silenced by the enemy's batteries, for his front was covered by a heavy fringe of pines Statement of General Potter--Ib., p. 87. Cf. statement of other Federal officers-Ib.; and now the eight-inch mortars in rear of Wright, and Langhorne's ten-inch mortars, from the Baxter road, took part in the dreadful chorus. On the Federal side, Griffin of Potter's division, not waiting for Wilcox, pushed forward his brigade, and gained ground to the north of the Crater, and Bliss' brigade of the same division, coming to his support, still further ground was gained in that direction. Burnside's official report, August 13th, 1864. Colonel Bliss, commanding First brigade, Second division, remained behind with the only regiment of h
n the Jerusalem plank road, and one Coehorn and two 12-pound mortars in the ravine, some two hundred yards to the left and rear of the breach, and two mortars to the left of Wright's battery, were all opened promptly on the assaulting columns. The practice of the four mortars on the plank road was admirable. Their shells dropped with precision upon the enemy's masses, huddled in disorder in front of and in the crater. Some three mortars on the right of the Baxter road, commanded by Lieutenant Langhorne, opened and continued, at intervals, with good effect until the close of the engagement. This sufficiently explains why the Federals, notwithstanding their thorough state of preparation—every contingency being cared for in advance—did not accomplish what was expected of them. Nor is their failure at all attributable to the absence of their corps and division commanders; for every colonel and every subordinate officer knew—if not every man of the assaulting column—what orders had
them), to such persons as they think meet, etc. Of these children, only one name appears on the record of births, viz. John, b. Nov. 1632. 2. Robert, prob. brother of Edmund (1), res. in Wat. and by w. Susan had Jonathan, b. 10 Sept. 1634; Deborah, b. 12 Oct. 1636; Joseph, b. 6 Aug. 1638; Daniel, b. 21 Mar. 1640; Ephraim, b. 1 Dec. 1641; Gershom, b. 6 Sept. 1643. Hinman says Robert the f. removed to Norwalk, Conn., as early as 1649. Longhorn, Thomas (otherwise written Longhorne and Langhorne), was a butcher and the town drummer. In 1652 he purchased the homestead previously owned by Simon Crosby, at the southerly corner of Brattle Street and Brattle Square, where he probably resided during the remainder of his life. He m. Sarah, dau. of Bartholomew Green, about 1646, and had Thomas, b. 26 Aug. 1647, bur. 5 Ap. 1648; Sarah, b. 26 Feb. 1648-9; Elizabeth, b. about 1651; Mary, b. 5 Sept. 1653, d. 27 Mar. 1654; Mary, b. 1 Mar. 1654-5; Samuel, bap. 9 Dec. 1660, d. young; Mercy, b
them), to such persons as they think meet, etc. Of these children, only one name appears on the record of births, viz. John, b. Nov. 1632. 2. Robert, prob. brother of Edmund (1), res. in Wat. and by w. Susan had Jonathan, b. 10 Sept. 1634; Deborah, b. 12 Oct. 1636; Joseph, b. 6 Aug. 1638; Daniel, b. 21 Mar. 1640; Ephraim, b. 1 Dec. 1641; Gershom, b. 6 Sept. 1643. Hinman says Robert the f. removed to Norwalk, Conn., as early as 1649. Longhorn, Thomas (otherwise written Longhorne and Langhorne), was a butcher and the town drummer. In 1652 he purchased the homestead previously owned by Simon Crosby, at the southerly corner of Brattle Street and Brattle Square, where he probably resided during the remainder of his life. He m. Sarah, dau. of Bartholomew Green, about 1646, and had Thomas, b. 26 Aug. 1647, bur. 5 Ap. 1648; Sarah, b. 26 Feb. 1648-9; Elizabeth, b. about 1651; Mary, b. 5 Sept. 1653, d. 27 Mar. 1654; Mary, b. 1 Mar. 1654-5; Samuel, bap. 9 Dec. 1660, d. young; Mercy, b
d there an entire Federal division remained, as a confused mass, which its officers tried in vain to move forward, in face of the scattering fire that the Confederate infantry, now rushing in from all directions, poured into the crater. Haskell's battery, the one nearest at hand on the plank road, was speedily moved forward and its fire was added to that of the musketry. Hamilton Chamberlayne, though sick in a near hospital, hastened to reinforce Haskell with his guns, while Wright and Langhorne, from the left. screened by a small body of pines, raked with canister, from their position in a salient, the ground between the crater and the Federal line of intrenchments, across which Burnside must send reinforcements. Grant's artillery showered shot and shell upon these Confederate batteries, but they stood bravely to their work. Burnside sent two more divisions to push forward the hesitating assault, but most of the men of these found refuge in the swarming mass that already nearl
Clay, lieutenant-colonel. Second Cavalry regiment (also called Thirtieth regiment): Breckinridge, Cary. major, lieutenant-colonel; Graves, William F., major; Langhorne, John S., major; Munford, Thomas T., lieutenantcol-onel, colonel; Radford, Richard Carlton Walker, colonel; Watts. James W., lieutenant-colonel. .Second batt major (appointment canceled); Funsten, David,. lieutenant-colonel, colonel; Garland, Samuel, Jr., colonel; Hutter, J. Risque, major; Harrison, Carter H., major; Langhorne, Maurice S., major, lieutenant-colonel, colonel; Otey, Kirkwood, major, lieutenant-colonel, colonel Twelfth Artillery battalion: Boggs, Francis J., major. lliam T., lieutenant-colonel. Forty-second Infantry regiment: Adams, P. B., major; Burks, Jesse S., colonel; Deyerle, Andrew J. . colonel; Lane, Henry, major; Langhorne, Daniel A., lieutenant-colonel; Martin, William, lieutenant-colonel; Penn, John E., major, lieutenant-colonel, colonel; Richardson, Jesse M., major; Saunders, Sa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), First Manassas. (search)
who on that day commanded the First Brigade, and Colonel John B. Kershaw, commanding the Second Regiment, South Carolina Volunteers. Colonel Radford's report will be found on page 532 of the same volume of The War of the Rebellion, Official Records, to which I above referred. In that report he says: I have no hesitation in saying that the charge made by my own command, in connection with that made by the command under Lieutenant-Colonel Munford, composed of Captains W. H. Payne, Ball, Langhorne, and Hale, caused the jam at Cub creek bridge, which resulted in the capture of fourteen pieces of cannon, their ammunition and wagons, five forges, thirty wagons, and ambulances, and some forty or fifty horses. I base this opinion on the fact that we were in advance of all our forces, and by our charge the enemy were thrown into wild confusion before us, their vehicles of all sorts going off at full speed, and in the greatest disorder. Colonel Kershaw, in his report, at pages 524-522
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Some of the drug conditions during the war between the States, 1861-5. (search)
, promoted Dr. Cowan to his personal staff with rank of major. There was another doctor who ought to have been promoted for this same sort of service, for diseases of the bowels, during long encampments, became pestilential. The food, especially the bread, when prepared by the ordinary mess soldier, seemed to be especially invented for the production of irritation. Such camp-made biscuit would these days prove a successful rival and threaten the rubber trust. An Alabama surgeon named Langhorne, with his hospital assistant, a good-natured fellow called Sonk, grieving over these miseries, determined to find a remedy in his total lack of drugs for these multiplied woes, characterized under the synonyms diree and diseremus. After drawing largely on all their genius, they invented a pill composed of equal parts of red pepper and crude rosin, the latter of which they gathered from the nearby trees, and which they consigned to immortality under the name of the Diseremus pill. It was
The Daily Dispatch: November 24, 1860., [Electronic resource], Virginia annual Conference.--Second day. (search)
his the various Conferences were assessed to raise each a specific amount, that of the Virginia Conference being $23,000. The treasury was empty, there was a deficit, and owing to the short crops and financial embarrassment, it was feared that the collections would be short, and the means of borrowing limited. The Board recommended that no new Missions be established without imperious necessity, and that the Conferences draw their quotas only in proportion to their collections. The Board hoped that retrenchment would be the order of the day, and the Board be enabled to follow the Apostolic injunction to "owe no man anything." Rev. Mr. Langhorne introduced a resolution, looking to an inquiry into the propriety of instrumental music in public worship, and to the best method of preventing its use, if declared an evil. A "fraternal messenger" from the Methodist Protestant Conference of Virginia was received and welcomed, and shortly after the Conference adjourned for the day.
itable basis shall be adopted, having reference both to numbers and to pecuniary ability, without pressing heavily upon any, and operating equitably upon all. The first resolution being before the Conference, Rev. Messrs. Coulling and Langhorne discussed the matter. Mr. Branch, of Petersburg, advocated the adoption of the report, and declared that the plan adopted by the Petersburg Quarterly Conference was the proper one. Rev. Dr. Smith thought that willingness to contribute had sometimes been mistaken for ability to contribute, by the district stewards, and as the cities were generally more willing to pay, they were sometimes indiscreetly assessed. Rev. Mr. Langhorne agreed with Dr. Smith, and the language of the resolutions, that numbers and ability should be estimated as a financial basis. He spoke with some spirit in regard to the manner in which Presiding Elders were sometimes met. The stationed preacher got all, and the Elder, if he was not present at t
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