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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Mary D. Lanier or search for Mary D. Lanier in all documents.

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That gets in ‘Stonewall's way.’ John Williamson Palmer. The dying words of Stonewall Jackson from Poems of Sidney Lanier; copyright, 1884, 1891, by Mary D. Lanier; published by Charles Scribner's sons. ‘Order A. P. Hill to prepare for battle.’ ‘Tell Major Hawks to advance the commissary train.’ ‘Let us cross the an be discovered, though it was written in September of 1865, while the young poet, who had lost his health in prison the winter before, was residing in Georgia. Lanier was later one of the first Southerers to express the sentiment of nationality. The stars of Night contain the glittering Day And rain his glory down with sweeter or, the remains of the illustrious leader were under the charge of the cadets, until his burial in the quiet cemetery above the town. The pure and noble words of Lanier need no comment. A few lines from an Englishman, Colonel G. F. R. Henderson, declare Jackson's life a message not for America alone. ‘The hero who lies
ampaigns in which he fought. These soldiers, like their companions under the hemlocks in the Wilderness, must await the call of the judgment day. The Hollywood cemetery at Richmond contains a larger host. Eighteen thousand Confederate veterans there sleep in everlasting peace amid beautiful surroundings. Around them lie many of Virginia's famous sons, generation after generation of loved and honored names. The tournament from Poems of Sidney Lanier; copyrighted, 1884, 1891, by Mary D. Lanier; published by Charles Scribner's sons. The ballad is a revised form of an early poem by Sidney Lanier. the psalm of the West, in which it was inserted, was written in 1876, and was one of the earliest Southern poems to express the feeling of national unity. The bright colors and the medieval simplicity of the treatment lend to this clear and beautiful fragment of allegory a directness of appeal that expresses well the thankfulness in the poet's heart. Though Lanier's thought in 1