hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 29 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 25 5 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 11 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 3, 1862., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 3, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 317 results in 117 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
ant flashes did his conversation. On Mr. Davis proclaiming Thanksgiving Day, after the unfortunate Tennessee campaign, Randolph versified the proclamation, section by section, as sample: For Bragg did well. Ah! who could tell What merely human mind could augur, That they would run from Lookout Mount, Who fought so well at Chickamauga! Round many a smoky camp-fire were sung clever songs, whose humor died with their gallant singers, for want of recording memories in those busy days. Latham, Caskie and Page McCarty sent out some of the best of the skits; a few verses of one by the latter's floating to mind, from the snowbound camp on the Potomac, stamped by his vein of rollicking satire-with-a-tear in it: Manassas' field ran red with gore, With blood the Bull Run ran; The freeman struck for hearth and home, Or any other man! And Longstreet with his fierce brigade Stood in the red redan; He waved his saber o'er his head, Or any other man! Ah! few shall part where many mee
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion, Appendix B. (search)
J. A. Early. 13th Mississippi. 4th South Carolina. 7th Virginia. 24th Virginia. Holmes's Reserve Brigade. Brigadier-General T. H. Holmes. 2d Tennessee. 1st Arkansas. Walker's Battery. Troops not brigaded. 7th Louisiana Infantry. 8th Louisiana Infantry. Hampton Legion (South Carolina) Infantry. 30th Virginia Cavalry. Harrison's Battalion Cavalry. Independent Companies (ten) Cavalry. Washington (Louisiana) Battalion Artillery. Artillery. Kemper's Battery Loudoun Battery. Latham's Battery. Shields's Battery. Camp Pickens Companies. Army of the Shenandoah (Johnston's Division), June 30, 1861. from return of that date. Brigadier-General Joseph E. Johnston. First Brigade. Colonel T. J. Jackson. 2d Virginia Infantry. 4th Virginia Infantry. 5th Virginia Infantry. 27th Virginia Infantry. Pendleton's Battery. Second Brigade. Colonel F. S. Bartow. 7th Georgia Infantry. 8th Georgia Infantry. 9th Georgia Infantry. Duncan's Kentucky Battalion. Pope'
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 20: events West of the Mississippi and in Middle Tennessee. (search)
eneral Williams ordered up the Ninth Connecticut, Fourth Wisconsin, and a section of Manning's battery to the support of the left, and the Thirtieth Massachusetts and two sections of Nimm's battery to the support of the right. The battle raged fiercely for about two hours, and in the hottest of the fray the Twenty-first Indiana was grandly conspicuous. It lost all of its field-officers before the end of the action. Lieutenant-colonel Keith and Major Hayes were severely wounded, and Adjutant Latham was killed. Seeing this, General Williams placed himself at its head, exclaiming, Boys! your field-officers are all gone; I will lead you. They gave him hearty cheers, when a bullet passed through his breast, and he fell dead. He had just issued directions for the line to fall back, which it did in good order, with Colonel T. W. Cahill, of the Ninth Connecticut, in chief command. The Confederates, dreadfully smitten, also fell back, and then retreated. So ended the battle of Baton
ery had again been increased by the addition of a number of pieces, as will be seen by the following report of Colonel Owen: headquarters battalion Washington artillery, New Orleans, February l5th, 1879. Copy of Report of Major Henry's Battalion of Artillery, July 19th, 1863, attached to Hood's Division, First (Longstreet's) Corps, Army of Northern Virginia: battery commanders.12 Napoleons.10 Parrots.3 inch Rifle. Captain Buckman,4   Captain Garden,31  Captain Reiley,231 Captain Latham,22   1161 Official copy from original return, 18. (Signed) W. M. Owen, Late Adjutant to Chief Artillery First Corps. This battalion completed the organization of as brave and heroic a division, numbering, approximately, eight thousand effectives, as was ever made ready for active service. So high-wrought was the pride and self-reliance of the troops that they believed they could carve their way through almost any number of the enemy's lines, formed in the open field in the
Hammond, Hemphill, Hunter, Iverson, Johnson, of Ark., Johnson, of Tenn., Kennedy, Lano (Oregon), Latham, Mallory, Mason, Nicholson, Pearce, Polk, Powell, Pugh, Rice, Sebastian, Slidell, Thomson, of N.hn R.,) of New Jersey, Bigler, of Pennsylvania, Rice, of Minnesota, Bright, of Indiana, Gwin and Latham, of California, Lane, of Oregon--in all, seven from Free States; with Messrs. Kennedy and Pearce of Iowa--21.--every Democratic Senator present but Mr. Pugh, of Ohio, voting for it; though Messrs. Latham, of California, Fitch, of Indiana, Rice, of Minnesota, and perhaps one or two others, had berittenden, Dixon, Doolittle, Foot, Grimes, Hale, Hamlin, Harlan, Johnson, of Tennessee, Kennedy, Latham, Polk, Pugh, Simmons, Ten Eyck, Toombs, Trumbull, Wade, and Wilson--26. Nays--Messrs. Benjamias rejected — Yeas 12; Nays 31--only Messrs. Clark, Clingman, Dixon, Foot, Foster, Hale, Hamlin, Latham, Pugh, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, and Wilson, voting in the affirmative. The original resolution was
This proposed amendment was finally concurred in by the Senate: Yeas 24; Nays 12: as follows: Yeas--Messrs. Anthony, Baker, Bigler, Bright, Crittenden, Dixon, Douglas, Foster, Grimes, Gwin, Harlan, Hunter, Johnson, of Tennessee, Kennedy, Latham, Mason, Morrill, Nicholson, Polk, Pugh, Rice, Sebastian, Ten Eyck, and Thomson-24. Nays--Messrs. Bingham, Chandler, Clark, Doolittle, Durkee, Foot, King, Sumner, Trumbull, Wade, Wilkinson, and Wilson--12. And then the Senate returned to th following vote: Yeas--Messrs. Crittenden, Douglas, Harlan, Johnson, of Tennessee, Kennedy, Morrill, and Thomson-7. Nays--Messrs. Bayard, Bigler, Bingham, Bright, Chandler, Clark, Dixon, Fessenden, Foot, Foster, Grimes, Gwin, Hunter, Lane, Latham, Mason, Nicholson, Polk, Pugh, Rice, Sebastian, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wigfall, Wilkinson, and Wilson--28. So the Senate, by four to one, disposed of the scheme of the Peace Commissioners, and proceeded to vote, directly thereafter
ate of the United States. Messrs. Bayard, of Del., and Latham, of Cal., sought to have this so modified as merely to dec Breckinridge, Bright, Johnson, of Mo., Johnson, of Tenn., Latham, Nesmith, Polk, Powell, and Rice--10. The Vice-Preside; which was advocated by Messrs. Andrew Johnson, of Tenn., Latham, of Cal., Trumbull, of Ill., Collamer, of Vt., and Ten EycHarris, Howe, Johnson, of Tenn., Johnson, of Mo., Kennedy, Latham, McDougall, Morrill, Nesmith, Polk, Powell, Saulsbury, Shesrs. Breckinridge, Bright, W. P. Johnson, of Mo., Kennedy, Latham, Nesmith, Polk, Powell, and Saulsbury--9. Nays--Messrs., of Tenn., Kennedy, King, Lane, of Ind., Lane, of Kansas, Latham, Morrill, Nesmith, Pomeroy, Saulsbury, Sherman, Ten Eyck, rs. Breckinridge, Bright, Carlile, Cowan, Johnson, of Mo., Latham, Pearce, Polk, Powell, Rice, and Saulsbury--11. Mr. Clas--Messrs. Bayard, Breckinridge, Bright, Johnson, of Mo., Latham, Pearce, Polk, Powell, and Saulsbury--9. Nays--Messrs.
ss. Meanwhile, the 21st Indiana, posted at the crossing of the roads — whose Colonel, suffering from wounds previously received, had twice essayed to join it, and each time fallen from his horse — had lost its Lt.-Col., Keith, Maj. Hayes, and Adj. Latham--the two former severely wounded, the latter killed — when Gen. Williams, seeing Latham fall, exclaimed, Indianians! your field-officers are all killed: I will lead you! and was that moment shot through the breast and fell dead; the command Latham fall, exclaimed, Indianians! your field-officers are all killed: I will lead you! and was that moment shot through the breast and fell dead; the command devolving on Col. T. W. Cahill, 9th Connecticut. But the battle was already won. The Rebel attack had exhausted its vitality without achieving any decided success; while the Arkansas,from which so much had been expected, had failed to come to time. Leaving Vicksburg, At 2 A. M., Aug. 3. she had steamed leisurely down the river until within 15 miles of Baton Rouge, where her starboard engine broke down; and it had been but partially repaired when the sound of his guns announced to her the <
ll, Pomeroy, Sherman. Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wilkinson, Wilmot, and Wilson, of Mass.--29. Nays--Messrs. Bayard, Carlile, Davis, Henderson. Kennedy, Latham, McDougall, Nesmith, Powell, Saulsbury, Stark, Willey, Wilson, of Mo., and Wright--14. This bill having reached the House, Mr. Stevens, of Pa., in Committee o when, on its coming up, Mar. 24. it was fiercely assailed by Mr. Saulsbury, of Delaware, and more temperately opposed by Messrs. Willey, of Va., McDougall and Latham, of Cal., and Powell, of Ky. Mr. Henderson, of Mo., supported it, and thenceforward acted as an emancipationist. Messrs. Sherman, of Ohio, Doolittle, of Wise., B], of N. J., and Willey, of Pa.); Nays--Messrs. Bayard and Saulsbury, of Del., Kennedy, of Md., Carlile, of Va., Powell, of Ky., Wilson, of Mo., Wright, of N. J., Latham, of Cal., Nesmith and Stark, of Oregon. It is noteworthy that a majority of these Nays were the votes of Senator from Border States, to which it proffered compen
removed. He was removed; and, within ten days, was with the enemy at Manassas. The Army Appropriation bill being before the Senate, Mr. Garrett Davis, of Ky., moved Jan. 28, 1863. to add: Provided, That no part of the sums appropriated by this act shall be disbursed for the pay, subsistence, or any other supplies, of any negro, free or slave, in the armed military service of the United States. Which was rejected: Yeas 8; Nays 28: Yeas--Messrs. Carlile, G. Davis, Kennedy, Latham, Nesmith, Powell, Turpie, and Wall (all Democrats). At the next session — the Deficiency bill being before the House--Mr. Harding, of Ky., moved Dec. 21, 1863. to insert-- Provided, That no part of the moneys aforesaid shall be applied to the raising, arming, equipping, or paying of negro soldiers. Which was likewise beaten: Yeas 41; Yays 105--the Yeas (all Democrats) being Messrs. Ancona, Bliss, James S. Brown, Coffroth, Cox, Dawson, Dennison, Eden, Edgerton, Eldridge, Fin
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...