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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 29 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 25 5 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 24 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 11 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 3, 1862., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 2, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Latham or search for Latham in all documents.

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ss. Meanwhile, the 21st Indiana, posted at the crossing of the roads — whose Colonel, suffering from wounds previously received, had twice essayed to join it, and each time fallen from his horse — had lost its Lt.-Col., Keith, Maj. Hayes, and Adj. Latham--the two former severely wounded, the latter killed — when Gen. Williams, seeing Latham fall, exclaimed, Indianians! your field-officers are all killed: I will lead you! and was that moment shot through the breast and fell dead; the command Latham fall, exclaimed, Indianians! your field-officers are all killed: I will lead you! and was that moment shot through the breast and fell dead; the command devolving on Col. T. W. Cahill, 9th Connecticut. But the battle was already won. The Rebel attack had exhausted its vitality without achieving any decided success; while the Arkansas,from which so much had been expected, had failed to come to time. Leaving Vicksburg, At 2 A. M., Aug. 3. she had steamed leisurely down the river until within 15 miles of Baton Rouge, where her starboard engine broke down; and it had been but partially repaired when the sound of his guns announced to her the <
ll, Pomeroy, Sherman. Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wilkinson, Wilmot, and Wilson, of Mass.--29. Nays--Messrs. Bayard, Carlile, Davis, Henderson. Kennedy, Latham, McDougall, Nesmith, Powell, Saulsbury, Stark, Willey, Wilson, of Mo., and Wright--14. This bill having reached the House, Mr. Stevens, of Pa., in Committee o when, on its coming up, Mar. 24. it was fiercely assailed by Mr. Saulsbury, of Delaware, and more temperately opposed by Messrs. Willey, of Va., McDougall and Latham, of Cal., and Powell, of Ky. Mr. Henderson, of Mo., supported it, and thenceforward acted as an emancipationist. Messrs. Sherman, of Ohio, Doolittle, of Wise., B], of N. J., and Willey, of Pa.); Nays--Messrs. Bayard and Saulsbury, of Del., Kennedy, of Md., Carlile, of Va., Powell, of Ky., Wilson, of Mo., Wright, of N. J., Latham, of Cal., Nesmith and Stark, of Oregon. It is noteworthy that a majority of these Nays were the votes of Senator from Border States, to which it proffered compen
removed. He was removed; and, within ten days, was with the enemy at Manassas. The Army Appropriation bill being before the Senate, Mr. Garrett Davis, of Ky., moved Jan. 28, 1863. to add: Provided, That no part of the sums appropriated by this act shall be disbursed for the pay, subsistence, or any other supplies, of any negro, free or slave, in the armed military service of the United States. Which was rejected: Yeas 8; Nays 28: Yeas--Messrs. Carlile, G. Davis, Kennedy, Latham, Nesmith, Powell, Turpie, and Wall (all Democrats). At the next session — the Deficiency bill being before the House--Mr. Harding, of Ky., moved Dec. 21, 1863. to insert-- Provided, That no part of the moneys aforesaid shall be applied to the raising, arming, equipping, or paying of negro soldiers. Which was likewise beaten: Yeas 41; Yays 105--the Yeas (all Democrats) being Messrs. Ancona, Bliss, James S. Brown, Coffroth, Cox, Dawson, Dennison, Eden, Edgerton, Eldridge, Fin