Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Lathrop or search for Lathrop in all documents.

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teers, Lieutenant-Col. Andrews. Two companies Second Regiment Missouri Volunteers, Major Osterhous. Three companies Third Regiment Missouri Volunteers, Colonel Siegel. Fifth Regiment Missouri Volunteers, Colonel Salamon. First Regiment Iowa Volunteers, Colonel J. F. Bates. First Regiment Kansas Volunteers, Colonel Deitzler. Second Regiment Kansas Volunteers, Colonel Mitchell. Two companies First Regular Cavalry, Captains Stanley and Carr. Three companies First Regular Cavalry (recruits), Lieut. Lathrop. Captain I. Totten's Battery Regular Artillery, six guns, six and twelve-pounders. Lieut. Dubois's Battery Regular Artillery, four guns, six and twelve-pounders. Captain Shaeffer's Battery Missouri Volunteer Artillery, six guns, six and twelve-pounders. The whole column was under the immediate command of Major-General Lyon, while Brigadier-Generals Sweeny, Siegel, and Major Sturgis were intrusted with the most important subsidiary charges. The march commenced at five o'clock on t
d the summit, and the defeated rebels dispersed rapidly, going in a direction which rendered it impossible for any considerable number of them to again participate in the battle. Totten's battery then threw a few balls as feelers, to draw out the enemy's cannon. Colonel Blair's regiment moved forward, and were soon met by a well-equipped regiment of Louisiana troops, whom, after a bitter contest of forty-five minutes, they succeeded in routing, though suffering severely themselves. Captain Lathrop's company of rifle recruits now assisted them, and together they, with Major Osterhaus' men, moved up the second hill, which was considerably larger than the first, and, meeting a third regiment, finally succeeded in driving them back with the assistance of Totten's battery, and gaining the summit. In this part of the fight the gallant Missouri volunteers acted bravely; indeed, no words of praise could more than do them justice. Of course, many acts of valor were performed not witne
d the summit, and the defeated rebels dispersed rapidly, going in a direction which rendered it impossible for any considerable number of them to again participate in the battle. Totten's battery then threw a few balls as feelers, to draw out the enemy's cannon. Colonel Blair's regiment moved forward, and were soon met by a well-equipped regiment of Louisiana troops, whom, after a bitter contest of forty-five minutes, they succeeded in routing, though suffering severely themselves. Captain Lathrop's company of rifle recruits now assisted them, and together they, with Major Osterhaus' men, moved up the second hill, which was considerably larger than the first, and, meeting a third regiment, finally succeeded in driving them back with the assistance of Totten's battery, and gaining the summit. In this part of the fight the gallant Missouri volunteers acted bravely; indeed, no words of praise could more than do them justice. Of course, many acts of valor were performed not witne