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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 3: the White Oak Road. (search)
struck quite to the right of us all, attacking in his own front. But it got into the reports otherwise, and went up. Grant accepted it as given; and so it has got into history, and never can be gotten out. General Miles did not get ahead of the Fifth Corps that day, but he came up gallantly on its flank and rendered it great assistance by turning the flank of General Wise and keeping the enemy from massing on our front. He reports the capture of the flag of the 47th Alabama, a regiment of Law's old brigade of Longstreet's Corps, which was nowhere near the front of the Fifth Corps on this day. In the investigations before the Court of Inquiry, General Warren felt under the necessity of excusing himself from the responsibility of the disastrous results of Ayres' advance on the morning of the thirty-first. He is at pains to show that he did not intend an attack there, although he had suggested the probable success of such movement. Records, Warren Court, Part II., p. 1525. Wh
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Military order of the Loyal Legion of the United States: headquarters Commandery of the State of Maine. (search)
l Warren, Engineer in Chief on Meade's staff, discovered that fact and that a strong force of the enemy was evidently preparing to move forward and take possession of it and thus gravely compromise our whole line of battle, he hastily gathered for its defence such troops as he could reach, among them Vincent's brigade in which was the 20th Maine. The brigade hastily mounted the hill and formed in line near the crest, the 20th Maine on the left of the line, barely in time to meet the onset of Law's brigade of Hood's division. The rebels came on as if determined to take possession of the crest and were met by the determination of its defenders to hold it. The opposing lines were but a few yards apart and in some instances there were hand to hand encounters. Colonel Chamberlain, discovering that a force of the enemy was moving towards his left flank and rear, promptly changed the front of his left wing and extended the line by taking intervals and forming in single rank. The enemy
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The campaign in Pennsylvania. (search)
, a little after dark, and Hood's Division got within nearly the same distance of the town about twelve o'clock at night. Law's Brigade was ordered forward to its division during the day, and joined about noon on the 2d. Previous to his joining I tery along the Emmettsburg road. Fearing that my force was too weak to venture to make an attack, I delayed until General Law's Brigade joined its division. As soon after his arrival as we could make our preparations, the movement was begun. Engiringing up his troops on the first day; but, notwithstanding this, the divisions of Hood and McLaws (with the exception of Law's Brigade) encamped within four miles of Gettysburg at midnight of the 1st of July. He then received instructions to movemettsburg road on the enemy's left; but fearing that his force was too weak to venture to make an attack, he delayed until Law's Brigade joined its division, about noon on the 2d. In this, General Longstreet clearly admits that he assumed the respo
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Life in Pennsylvania. (search)
the extreme right. It was fully eleven o'clock when General Lee arrived at this conclusion and ordered the movement. In the meantime, by General Lee's authority, Law's Brigade, which had been put upon picket duty, was ordered to rejoin my command, and, upon my suggestion that it would be better to await its arrival, General Lee d were mostly Georgians, as follows: The four Georgia brigades of Generals Benning, Anderson, Wofford, and Semmes, General Kershaw's South Carolina Brigade, General Law's Alabama Brigade, General Barksdale's (afterward General Humphrey's) Mississippi Brigade, and General Robertson's Texas Brigade. Our men had no thought of retreat. orders fro m General Lee to attack until about eleven o'clock on the 2d; that I immediately began my dispositions for attack; that I waited about forty minutes for Law's Brigade, by General Lee's assenting authority; that by especial orders from General Lee, my corps marched into position by a circuitous route, under the direction
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The career of General A. P. Hill. (search)
om the determined fire of the enemy.--Hill's single division fought, says General Lee, with the impetuous courage for which that officer and his troops are distinguished. Still the incessant shower of missiles from the forts on the eminence, still the crash and bustle of the enfilading batteries across the stream. The slaughter has been terrific; some of Hill's brigades were broken; and at four o'clock, though Longstreet had thrown his fine division in upon the right, and Hood's Texans and Law's Mississippians were surpassing heroism in their magnificent disregard of death, the fortune of the day remained with McClellan. But Hill re-formed his shattered lines and still fought on close under the frowning brow of the hostile intrenchments. And now, through the swampy woodland to the left rings a cheer and the rattle of musketry. It passes like wine through the veins of the men of whom one bloody morning has made veterans. Jackson, with defiant energy, had rectified the blunders o
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 12: Gettysburg. (search)
avail himself of any success that might be gained. Meade had sent Kilpatrick's division of cavalry-two brigades — under Merritt and Farnsworth, to his left; they arrived there about 12 M., and may have looked, mounted and dismounted, formidable on Longstreet's flank, but were not. Nothing could be gained by charging Longstreet's infantry in the position they held, and later the same day, when it was attempted, the cavalry were easily driven off and held at bay by two or three regiments of Law's brigade on the extreme right. Cavalry charges against infantry can not be made as formerly, because the improved range and rapidity of fire of cannon and small arms mow them down before they get to close quarters. The Federal cavalry rendered the greatest assistance, however, to Meade, and his thanks are due to them for keeping out of the fight the fine infantry divisions of Hood and McLaws. The assaulting column was at last formed: Pickett's division of three brigades, five thousand
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
ng him to make a reconnoissance of the ground in his front, with a view of making the main attack on his left, A short time afterwards he followed Colonel Venable in person. He returned at about 9 o'clock and informed me that it would not do to have Ewell to open the attack. He finally determined that I should make the main attack on the extreme right. It was fully 11 o'clock when General Lee arrived at this conclusion and ordered the movement. In the meantime, by General Lee's authority, Law's brigade, which had been put upon picket duty, was ordered to rejoin my command, and upon my suggestion that it would be better to await its arrival, General Lee assented. We awaited about forty minutes for these troops and then moved forward. A delay of several hours occurred in the march of the troops. The cause of this delay was that we had been ordered by General Lee to proceed cautiously upon the forward movement so as to avoid being seen by the enemy. General Lee ordered Colonel Jo
Mitchell, Justin S. Morrill, Olin, Pot-ter, Alex. H. Rice, Edward H. Rollins, Sedgwick, Sheffield, Shellabarger, Sherman, Sloan, Spaulding, Stevens, Benj. F. Thomas, Train, Van Horne, Verree, Wallace, Charles W. Walton, E. P. Walton, Wheeler, Albert S. White, and Windom--60. Nays--Messrs. Allen, Ancona, Joseph Baily, George H. Browne, Burnett, Calvert, Cox, Cravens, Crisfield, Crittenden, Diven, Dunlap, Dunn, English, Fouke, Grider, Haight, Hale, Harding, Holman, Horton, Jackson, Johnson, Law, May, McClernand, McPherson, Mallory, Menzies, Morris, Noble, Norton, Odell, Pendleton, Porter, Reid, Robinson, James S. Rollins, Sheil, Smith, John B. Steele, Stratton, Francis Thomas, Vallandigham, Voorhees, Wadsworth, Webster, and Wickliffe--48. The bill, thus amended, being returned to the Senate, Mr. Trumbull moved a concurrence in the house amendment, which prevailed by the following vote: Yeas--Messrs. Anthony, Bingham, Browning, Clark, Collamer, Dixon, Doolittle, Fessenden, Fo
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 5 (search)
hickahominy, by the road to the Grape-vine Ford. A few minutes after this, a battery, at the point where this infantry had disappeared, opened its fire upon the head of the Confederate column. A regiment sent against it was received with a volley of musketry, as well as canister, and recoiled. The leading brigade, commanded by Colonel Law, then advanced, and so much strength was developed by the enemy, that General Smith formed his other brigades and brought them into battle on the left of Law's. An obstinate contest began, and was maintained on equal terms; although the Confederates engaged superior numbers in a position of their own choosing. I had passed the railroad some little distance with Hood's brigade, when the action commenced, and stopped to see its termination. But, being confident that the Federal troops opposing ours were those whose camps I had just seen, and therefore not more than a brigade, I did not doubt that General Smith was quite strong enough to cope w
of foreign relations, whose relations abroad decline to acknowledge the connection, a department of the Interior representing a nature-abhorred vacuum, an Attorney-General without law, and a Patent-Office which, in the absence of other business, should issue letters securing the exclusive right of this new-fledged confederacy to those who invented it, for its extraordinary novelty rather than its acknowledged utility; that it may be preserved to after-times in the world's curiosityshop, with Law's scheme of banking, the moonhoax of Locke, the messages of the President and Queen over the submarine telegraph, and Redheiffer's perpetual motion. The advocates of the right of Secession in claiming that a State, after its solemn admission and while enjoying the protection and participating in the fruits of the Union, may at its pleasure, and by its own act, secede, to be consistent, should hold that a nation may at pleasure withdraw from its treaty obligations without previous provision
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