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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for J. G. Law or search for J. G. Law in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ke up a line around the enemy's position at Chatanooga. I desire to mention the following named officers as distinguished for conduct and ability, viz: Major-Generals Hoods, Buckner, Hindman and Stewart; Brigadier-Generals B. R. Johnson, Preston, Law, (respectively in command of division), Kershaw, Patton, Anderson, Gracie, McNair), (severely wounded), and Colonels Trigg and Kelly, both in command of brigades. Honorable mention should also be made of Brigadier-General Humphreys, Benning, Deasn on the 20th, was two thousand and thirty-three officers, and twenty thousand eight hundred and forty-nine men. I have the honor to be, Colonel, Very respectfully, your obedient servant, J. Longstreet, Lieutenant-General. Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. Battle of Belmont. November 7th, 1861.—I have lived through an awful day. Have been engaged in my first battle. Reached Columbus early this morning. Everything was quiet, and I went to the river to see my mother, who was on board th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chickamauga. (search)
he Red-House Ford, and halted about noon. During that night I received orders to march the entire command back to Chattanooga, and moved in pursuance thereof early on the 23d. We reached the Watkins House about 11 o'clock A. M., and proceeded to take up a line around the enemy's position at Chatanooga. I desire to mention the following named officers as distinguished for conduct and ability, viz: Major-Generals Hoods, Buckner, Hindman and Stewart; Brigadier-Generals B. R. Johnson, Preston, Law, (respectively in command of division), Kershaw, Patton, Anderson, Gracie, McNair), (severely wounded), and Colonels Trigg and Kelly, both in command of brigades. Honorable mention should also be made of Brigadier-General Humphreys, Benning, Deas, Clayton, Bate, Brown, Robertson and Manigault. For more detailed accounts of the noble deeds performed by our gallant officers and brave soldiers, I refer you to the reports of my junior officers. The steady good conduct throughout the long confl
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. Battle of Belmont. November 7th, 1861.—I have lived through an awful day. Have been engaged in my first battle. Reached Columbus early this morning. Everything was quiet, and I went to the river to see my mother, who was on board the Prince. There I met Colonel Smith, Promoted to the rank of Brigadier-General and killed in the battle of Chickamauga. who ordered me back to camp as the gunboats had just commenced an attack on our batteries, and a large force of Federals were reported advancing on the Missouri side of the river. I had barely reached camp when the rattle of musketry and the booming of cannon announced that the battle had begun. Our regiment was ordered to to form in line and be ready to move at a moment's notice. One wild shout went up from a thousand throats at the prospect of meeting the enemy, and we were soon in line waiting with breathless anxiety for the command, Forward march. Full two hours elapsed, the roar of cannon, an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. January 1st, 1862.—Spent the day at the hospital, having no heart for new year calls in these trying times. It is really frightful to reflect on the events of the past year, and I sometimes imagine that I am dreaming through an age of terrible import, but alas, I awake to the stern reality of the unhappy and distracted state of our country. I see no prospect of a speedy peace, and can only hope and pray for the best. It is said that every life must have its rainy days. The same might be said of nations. We cannot always have prosperity, and enjoy peace and plenty. Grim visaged war must stalk through our fair land, uproot our institutions, both civil and religious, revolutionize society, and shake its foundations to their very centre. But we must toil on, and try to recognize in this terrible calamity the hand of God, and believe that all things are working together for good. His ways are mysterious and past finding out. February 20th.—Our infan
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Major-General S. B. Buckner of the battle of Chickamauga. (search)
e with Preston's line. In his front was a heavy breastwork of logs, on the summit of a slight ridge heavily wooded and strongly held by the enemy's infantry and artillery. His right flank was opposite the angle of this work; his centre, facing towards the northwest, was opposed to the flank of the work, which was perpendicular to the road. On Stewart's right, in front of the face of the work, and parallel to the Chattanooga road, was Cleburne's division, of Hill's corps. Brigadier-General Law's brigade, of Hood's division, was in line perpendicular to the road to the left, and slightly in advance of Preston, and close by the burnt house (Poe's), near which was a battery of Hood's artillery. A personal reconnoissance, in company with the Lieutenant-General commanding, showed an advantageous position for artillery in front of Poe's burning house, from which point the enemy's main line, which fronted eastward, and was situated a little to the east of Kelly's field, was exposed to an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. battle of Shiloh. Sunday, April 6, 1862.—Have been quite unwell for several days, and came on to Corinth with the sick a few days since, and engaged a room at the hotel. The quiet of this Sabbath morning is disturbed by the sullen boom of cannon in the direction of Tennessee river. The blood boils in my veins, and moves me to shoulder arms and march to the scene of the conflict. Trusting not in Beauregard, nor in the valor of our troops, but in God, victory must perch upon our banners. Six o'clock P. M..—Have just halted for supper and a little rest, after a walk of ten miles. The incessant roar of artillery is still heard, and from the sick and wounded who are on their way to Corinth from the battle-field I learn that the Confederates, under General Albert Sidney Johnston, attacked the Federal army under General Grant this morning, and that our troops are driving the enemy with heavy loss on both sides. We have driven them out of their encampment,