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Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 18 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 10 4 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 7 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 0 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 6 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 4 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington. You can also browse the collection for Lawler or search for Lawler in all documents.

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7 wounded, and 145 missing; total, 1,363. The fighting at the Big Black River Bridge was a brilliant affair, in which the Thirteenth Corps alone participated; loss, 39 killed, 237 wounded, and 3 missing; total, 279, the bulk of which occurred in Lawler's Brigade of Carr's Division. In the first assault on Vicksburg, May 19th, the corps sustained a slight loss only; but in the grand assault of May 22d it suffered severely, losing 202 killed, 1,004 wounded, and 69 missing; total, 1,275. During ril, 1864. General McClernand was again in command of the corps; the Third Division was commanded by General Cameron, and the Fourth, by General Landram. The First and Second Divisions remained in Texas during the Red River Expedition, excepting Lawler's (2d) Brigade, of the First Division, which joined Banks' Army about the 20th of April. The Third and Fourth Divisions of the Thirteenth Corps were actively engaged at the battle of Sabine Cross Roads, La., April 8, 1864, in which they sustaine
federate regiments. During the March to the Sea, and through the Carolinas, the division--Fourth Division, Seventeenth Army Corps--was commanded by General Giles A. Smith, and the brigade, by General Belknap. Twenty-Second Iowa Infantry. Lawler's Brigade — Carr's (E. A.) Division--Thirteenth Corps. (1) Col. William M. Stone; Bvt. Brig.-Gen. (2) Col. Harvey Graham; Bvt. Brig.-Gen. companies. killed and died of wounds. died of disease, accidents, in Prison, &c. Total Enrollment, 1862, leaving the State on September 14th. It was stationed at Rolla, Mo., during the rest of the year, and at other points in Missouri until March, 1863, when it joined Grant's Army, then commencing the Vicksburg campaign. It was assigned to Lawler's (2d) Brigade, Carr's Division, Thirteenth Corps. It was engaged at Port Gibson, the opening battle of the Vicksburg campaign, where it lost 2 killed and 21 wounded; was in reserve at Champion's Hill; was slightly engaged at Black River Bridge,<
nfantry, inclusive — were sworn in for three months service, at the expiration of which they reorganized and enlisted for three years. Illinois responded promptly to every call for men, and was one of the few States which furnished troops in excess of its quota. Of the generals who attained prominence in the war, Illinois is credited with: Grant, Logan, McClernand, Schofield, Palmer, Hurlbut, Black, Giles A. Smith, Oglesby, McArthur, Grierson, John E. Smith, Eugene A. Carr, White, Carlin, Lawler, Morgan, E. J. Farnsworth, Mulligan, and many others. As in the troops from other States, many of the Illinois regiments had distinctive synonyms by which they were known as well as by their numerical designations. Among these were: First Scotch 12th Illinois. Yates Phalanx 39th Illinois. Second Scotch 65th Illinois. First Douglass 42d Illinois. First Irish 23d Illinois. Northwestern Rifles 44th Illinois. Irish Legion 90th Illinois. Lead Mine regiment 45th Il