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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 8 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Charles Lawrence or search for Charles Lawrence in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 20: a brave officer's mortification.--history set right. (search)
Ensign, A. H. Reynolds; Surgeon J. W. Taylor; Assistant-Surgeon, W. B. Dick; Paymaster, G. L. Davis; Chief Engineer, S. D. Hibbert; Second-Assistant Engineers, S. L. P. Ayres and C. H. Ball; Third-Assistant Engineers, J. L. Vanclain, G. W. Magee, J. T. Hawkins, F. G. Smith, Jr., and J. C. Huntly; First-Lieutenant of Marines, J. C. Harris; Acting-Masters' Mates, Chas, Gainsford, Jos. Kent, L. Richards and G. A. Storm; Boatswain, N. Goodrich; Gunner, D. A. Roe; Carpenter, J. E. Cox; Sailmaker, Charles Lawrence. Sloop-of-war Portsmouth. Commander, Samuel Swartwout; Lieutenant, F. O. Davenport; Acting-Masters, W. G. Mitchell, E. A. Terrill and A. A. Ward; Midshipman, Walter Abbott; Surgeon, J. S. Dungan; Assistant Surgeon, H. M. Wells; Assistant Paymaster, Casper Schenck; First-Lieutenant of Marines, Wm. H. Hale; Gunner, T. S. Cassidy; Carpenter, John Shannon; Sailmaker, N. J. Hayden; Acting-Masters' Mate, S. S. Beck. Steamer Pinola. Lieutenant-Commander, Pierce Crosby; Lieute
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 23: destruction of the ram Arkansas.--capture of Galveston.--capture of the Harriet Lane.--sinking of the Hatteras.--attack on Baton Rouge.--Miscellaneous engagements of the gun-boats. (search)
dson and Henry Western, Jr. Steamer Pensacola. Commodore, Henry W. Morris; Lieutenants, Geo. H. Perkins and C. E. McKay; Surgeon, J. W. Taylor; Assistant Surgeons, W. B. Dick and Chas. Giberson; Paymaster, G. L. Davis; Chief Engineer, D. D. Hibbert; 2d Lieutenant Marines, J. C. Harris; Assistant Engineers, S. L. P. Ayres, C. H. Ball, F. G. Smith, J. L. Vauclain, J. T. Hawkins, J. C. Huntley and E. A. Magee; Boatswain, Nelson Goodrich; Gunner, D. A. Roe; Carpenter, J. E. Cox; Sailmaker, Charles Lawrence; Acting-Masters, G. C. Schulze, F. H. Grove and Edw. Herrick; Acting-Masters' Mates, G. A. Storm, Joseph Kent and Chas. Gainsford. Steamer Brooklyn. Commodore, H. H. Bell; Lieutenant-Commander, Chester Hatfield; Lieutenant, A. N. Mitchell; Surgeon, Samuel Jackson; Assistant Surgeon, C. J. S. Wells; Paymaster, C. W. Abbot; Chief Engineer, W. B. Brooks; 1st Lieutenant Marines, James Forney; Ensign, M. W. Saunders; Midshipmen, John R. Bartlett and H. T. Grafton; Assistant Engin
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 43: operations of the Mississippi squadron, under Admiral Porter, after the Red River expedition. (search)
e gun upon them — this, too, after their officer (an acting ensign) had retreated, and behaved so badly that his resignation was afterwards demanded. Here was a great difference between the men and their officer, and it is to be hoped that the former will live to see their names honorably mentioned while that of their leader is withheld as unworthy of notice. On the 13th of April, the Confederates, taking advantage of the absence of the gun-boats, marched on Columbus. Ky.; but when Colonel Lawrence, who commanded the post, refused to listen to a demand for its surrender, they turned upon Fort Pillow, and captured it after a desperate conflict. Fort Pillow was retaken by Lieutenant-Commander Fitch, but the enemy carried off with them everything it had contained in the shape of guns or stores, and retreated to Ashport. The Union transports then landed troops at the foot of the hill, who reoccupied the fort, where traces of the massacre were still visible, and where ruin and deso
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
Nair and G. V. Sumner; Surgeon, Wm. Lansdale; Assistant-Surgeon, W. H. Jones; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, J. H. Stevenson; Marines: First-Lieutenant, Norval L. Nokes; Acting-Masters, F. T. King, Thos. Andrews and S. B. Washburne; Acting-Ensign, V. W. Jones; Engineers: First-Assistant, John Purdy, Jr.; Second-Assistants, A. H. Able and Alfred Colin; Third-Assistants, T. W. Fitch, F. C. Burchard and G. V. Baird; Boatswain, James Herold; Gunner, David Roe; Carpenter, Edward Cox; Saillmaker, Chas. Lawrence. Steam-frigate Colorado. Commodore, Henry K. Thatcher; Lieutenants, H. W. Miller and Benj. F. Day; Paymaster, W. H. H. Williams; Chaplain, D. X. Junkin; Assistant-Surgeons, A. W. H. Hawkins and Matthew Chalmers; Marines: Captain, Geo. R. Graham; Second-Lieutenant, S. C. Adams; Acting Masters, Thos. Hanrahan and Charles Folsom; Acting-Ensigns, Henry Avery, F. P. Biblos and B. B. Knowlton; Acting-Master's Mates, A. O. Child, C. H. Little-field, W. G. Perry, J. L. Vennard and Leon Bry
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 50: Second attack on Fort Fisher. (search)
xed up together. It was a sickening sight and took away much of the pleasure of the victory; but soldiers and sailors grew accustomed to such things during the war, and the active work still before them, ere they could reach Wilmington and secure the railroad leading to Richmond, soon drove the dreadful spectacle from their minds. Regarding the gallant soldiers, who so nobly fought their way over the bomb-proofs, too much cannot be said in their praise. Terry, their leader, Ames, Curtis, Lawrence, and Pennypacker, should never be forgotten; while those in the Navy, who fought their ships so well and so persistently, will, in future years, be remembered and honored as were the heroes of 1812. when our infant Navy showed the mistress of the seas that she would one day have to divide her honors with the young Republic. A number of the 100-pounder Parrott rifles burst while in action, and the commanders and men, having lost confidence in them, they were no longer used. The conseque