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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 4., Incidents and reminiscences of the Fire Department of Medford. (search)
mbership, which the present company prize as relics of auld lang syne. Mr. Francis A. Wait has hanging in the front hall of his house three buckets inscribed as follows: One, John A. Fulton1785. Two, Nathan Wait1810. The following are those in the hook and ladder carriage room: Two, J. Swan1785. Two, Ebenezer Hall1785. Two, Benjamin Fisk1800. One, Daniel Swan1821. Two, Robert Bacon1822. Two, Thomas R. Peck1827. Two, Abnah Bartlettno date. One, E. Hallno date. One, Daniel Lawrence1841. One, Timothy Cottingno date. One, Samuel Chaseno date. Two, Andrew Blanchard, Columbian Eagle Fire Society. One, Nathan Sawyerno date. One, Gov. BrooksNo. 1 One, Gen'l JacksonNo. 2. We have now in the service of the city an organization bearing the name of Washington Hook and Ladder Company which has been in existence for seventy-two years without interruption. From time to time this has been composed of many of our best and most influential citizens, who were imbue
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 4., Reminiscences of an earlier Medford. (search)
eir conversation, reverting to incidents which occurred in their youth, opened vistas into a past which now seems very remote to us. Other patrons of the reading-room, belonging to a later generation, were Samuel Lapham, Joseph Manning, 2d., Daniel Lawrence, George L. Stearns, John Sparrell, Jonas Coburn, George Hervey, Dudley C. Hall, Peter C. Hall, George W. Porter, John Clough, Albert H. Butters, and Col. Francis R. Bigelow, and there were doubtless others whose names escape me. Let it be rreat changes. A wooden building used to occupy the present site of Bigelow's brick block next the river. This building, or a part of it, was tenanted by Mr. Patrick Conolly, a tall, thin Irishman of severe aspect, a cobbler by profession. General Lawrence tells of Mr. Conolly that on one St. Patrick's day, after making his usual preparations for attendance upon the festival in Boston,—assuming the swallow-tail coat and high hat essential to the occasion,—he concluded to take his money along