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and a threat that if the place was not surrendered, and he should be compelled to attack it no quarter whatever should be shown to the negro troops. To this Colonel Lawrence, in command of the post, replied, that surrender was out of the question, as he had been placed there by his government to hold and defend the place, and shothe duty. Question. What became of the enemy after the repulse? Answer. They went south, and on the twenty-sixth I was notified by Colonel Hicks and by Colonel Lawrence that they were approaching Columbus. Question. What was done? Answer. I went to Columbus again, with such men as could be withdrawn from Cairo, and awaah, and Columbus, showing premeditation on the part of officers in command of the rebel army. [Take in from reports of Lieutenant Gray, Colonel Hicks, and Colonel Lawrence, with which the Committee is furnished. See Appendix.] Question. Has there been cooperation and harmony among commanders since these troubles began? A
equires especial mention for his services. His batteries were always posted with judgment, and served with marked ability. The precision of his fire at Lookout and Ringgold elicited universal admiration. To my staff more than ever am I indebted for the assistance rendered upon this occasion. Major-General Butterfield, Chief of Staff, always useful in counsel, was untiring and devoted on the field. Captain H. W. Perkins, Assistant Adjutant-General, Colonel James D. Fessenden, Major William H. Lawrence, Captain R. H. Hall, Lieutenants P. A. Oliver, and Samuel W. Taylor, aids-de-camp, bravely and intelligently performed all their duties. Lieutenant H. C. Wharton, a promising young officer of engineers, reported to me from the staff of the Major-General commanding the department, and was unwearied in his assistance, both as an engineer and as an officer of my personal staff. Major-General Howard has furnished me for transmittal his able report of the operations and services o
Doc. 48.-expedition into Virginia. The expedition embarked from Point Lookout on the morning of the twelfth of January, 1864, under command of Brigadier-General Marston, accompanied by Adjutant-General Lawrence and other members of his staff. It consisted of three hundred infantry and one hundred and thirty men of the Second and Fifth United States cavalry, under command of Lieutenants John Mix and Clark. A landing was effected at Kinsale, Virginia, on the Yeomico River, at an early hour, and thirty of the cavalry were detached to accompany the infantry. The remainder of the cavalry, numbering about one hundred, proceeded direct to Warshaw Court-House, Richmond County, where they found a large quantity of rebel government stores, consisting of pork and bacon, which they took possession of and destroyed. A quantity of grain was also destroyed, and a rebel major and several other prisoners, who were in command of the post, were taken prisoners, the appearance of our troops b
sense of its duty. The invitation to the slaves to rise against their masters, the suggested insurrection, caused, says Bancroft, a thrill of indignation to run through Virginia, effacing all differences of party, and rousing one strong, impassioned purpose to drive away the insolent power by which it had been put forth. A contemporary annalist, adverting to the same proclamation, said: It was received with the greatest horror in all the colonies. The policy adopted by Dunmore, says Lawrence in his notes on Wheaton, of arming the slaves against their masters, was not pursued during the war of the Revolution; and when negoes were taken by the English, they were not considered otherwise than as property and plunder. Emancipation of slaves as a war measure has been severely condemned and denounced by the, most eminent publicists in Europe and the United States. The United States, in their diplomatic relations, have ever maintained, says the Northern authority just quoted, that