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Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 0 Browse Search
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 6 0 Browse Search
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Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 10: Second Manassas-SharpsburgFredericksburg (search)
pected success, was as clearly defined as a movement on a chessboard, and I confess that tears started to and even from my eyes; but a moment later a great outburst of fire a little back of the line of battle indicated that the intruders had been gallantly met by our second line, or our reserves, and in a few moments out they rushed, the victors yelling at their heels. My uncle, William Henry Stiles, colonel of the Sixtieth Georgia, and who, in the absence of the general, was in command of Lawton's brigade in the battle, told me an amusing story of this particular fight. When his brigade, with others, was ordered to stem this irruption, drive out the intruders and reestablish-or rather, for the first time properly extend and connect-our lines, his men were double-quicking to the point of peril and he running from one end to the other of his brigade line to see that all parts were kept properly dressed up, when he observed one of the conscripts who had lately been sent to his regi
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 12: between Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville (search)
he surrender of the camp, and the refusal, the charge, and the repulse; the front, the flank, the rear attack. And there was intense earnestness in the struggle-sometimes limbs were broken and eyes, at least temporarily, put out, and the camp equipment of the vanquished was regarded as fair booty to the victors. I recall a visit paid in company with my father, not long after the battle of Fredericksburg, to the camp of my uncle mentioned in a former chapter as having been in command of Lawton's brigade in that fight. He was still in command of it. My father asked the cause of several very heavy bruises on his face. I never saw my uncle more deeply embarrassed, as he related, blushing like a girl, what he called his preposterous experience in leading his brigade the day before in a snow battle with Hoke's, which lasted several hours-and as the really laughable picture was developed, its strong coloring heightened by my uncle's embarrassed blushes, I never saw my father more hear
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Index. (search)
185, 193, 196, 213, 219 Kathleen Mavourneen, 49 Kean, William C., Jr., 45-46, 145-51, 229, 241-42, 258, 305, 316, 351 Keitt, Lawrence Massillon, 26-27, 273-74. Kershaw, Joseph Brevard, 270, 273-78, 280-83, 286-87, 294, 299-300, 339 Killing of prisoners, 80-81. Kilpatrick, Hugh Judson, 237 King William Artillery (Va.), 91 Kingsley, Charles, 92 Lane, James Henry, 134 Latimer's Artillery Battalion, 217-18. Latrobe, Osmun, 272 Law, Evander McIvor, 276, 286 Lawton, Alexander Robert, 135, 158 Lee, Fitzhugh, 18, 164, 178, 263 Lee, George Washington Custis: described, 312; mentioned, 238-39, 316-17, 332-34. Lee, Mary Custis (Mrs. Robert E.), 238-39, 357 Lee, Robert Edward: attitude of his men toward, 18-23, 72, 169-70, 189, 205, 226, 259-60, 266, 305-306, 325; and Chancellorsville Campaign, 164- 66, 168-69, 174-81, 238; comments on Meade, 227-28; compared with divine figures, 20-21; criticized, 22, 228; description of and anecdotes concerning, 99-101,
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
1863. His death occurred at Washington, June 20, 1888. Alexander Robert Lawton Alexander Robert Lawton, who was quartermaster-general Alexander Robert Lawton, who was quartermaster-general during the latter part of the conflict, was born in St. Peter's parish, South Carolina, November 4, 1818, the grandson of an officer of the Cge of the department of quartermaster-general, and notwithstanding Lawton's earnest request to be returned to the field, the president persisted in appointing him as quartermaster-general. Lawton's judicious and thorough administration fully justified Mr. Davis, notwithstanding thef official talent in any department during the Confederate war. General Lawton often sought the privilege of again fighting in the field, but quired his retention to the close. At the close of hostilities General Lawton resumed at Savannah the law practice in which he had establishen the Maryland campaign and at Sharpsburg after the wounding of General Lawton, he took command of Ewell's division, and also skillfully direc