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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 46 6 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 44 6 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 34 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 24 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 4 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 14 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 13 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee. You can also browse the collection for Lawton or search for Lawton in all documents.

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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 7: Atlantic coast defenses.-assigned to duty in Richmond as commander in chief under the direction of the Southern President. (search)
that his enemy could surmount the difficulties they presented. These cities were the cherished objective points of the administration at Washington, and large numbers of soldiers and sailors were at various times during the war employed to secure their capture. Their safety for so long a period from impending dangers upon every side was due to the military skill of Lee, as well as to the efforts of the accomplished officers who were in immediate command-General Ripley at Charleston and General Lawton at Savannah. Well might a prophetic tongue utter at this period that the time would come when Lee's superior abilities would be vindicated, both to his own renown and the glory of his country. On February 8, 1862, he writes his wife from Savannah: I wrote you the day I left Coosawhatchie. I have been here ever since endeavoring to push forward the works for the defense of the city. Guns are scarce as well as ammunition. I shall have to bring up batteries from the coast, I fear, to
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 8: commands the army defending Richmond, and seven days battles. (search)
practicability of reenforcing you has been the subject of earnest consideration. It has been determined to do so at the expense of weakening this army. Brigadier-General Lawton, with six regiments from Georgia, is on the way to you, and Brigadier-General Whiting, with eight veteran regiments, leaves here to-day. The object is tve your unavailable troops to watch the country and guard the passes covered by your cavalry and artillery and with your main body, including Ewell's division and Lawton's and Whiting's command, move rapidly to Ashland by rail or otherwise, as you may find most advantageous, and sweep down between the Chickahominy and Pamunkey, cuim with a picket line while he reported at Richmond with the greater part of his effective forces. Lee wished the first information of the arrival of Whiting and Lawton to Jackson to be given to his enemy by a victory in the Valley. On this day, too, he published Special Orders No. 130, Headquarters, Northern Virginia, June 11,
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 10: Sharpsburg and Fredericksburg. (search)
the advantage in the engagement which followed. Jackson reached Sharpsburg that morning from Harper's Ferry, and Walker later. At night Hood was relieved by Lawton's and Trimble's brigades of Ewell's division. Jackson's division, under General J. R. Jones, was placed on Lawton's left, supported by the remaining brigades of Lawton's left, supported by the remaining brigades of Ewell, while General Walker with his two brigades was placed on Longstreet's right. The cavalry were located on either flank. These are all the troops McClellan would have encountered if he had attacked on the 16th. Anderson's six brigades, McLaws's four, and A. P. Hill's five-making fifteen brigades-did not reach Lee until d to fall back. General J. R. Jones was obliged to leave the field, and the brave General Starke (as General Lee called him), who succeeded him, was killed. General Lawton was wounded, and was succeeded by Early, who had been supporting the cavalry and horse artillery in defending a most important hill, which if occupied by the
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
n, General, 197. Keith, Rev., John, 26. Kemper, General, wounded at Gettysburg, 296. Kershaw's division in the Valley, 353- Kershaw, General, captured, 385. Keyes, General E. D., 140, 145. Kilpatrick's cavalry, 266, 270, 315; raid on Richmond, 323. King's division, 191, 192, 193. Kossuth, General, Louis, 423. Lacy House, 229. Lacy, Rev. Dr. B. T., 246. Lafayette, Marquis, 10. La Haye, Sainte, 420. Last cavalry engagement, 393. Latane, Captain, killed, 153. Lawton, General, 130. League of Gileadites, 75. Ledlie, General, 357, 358, 359- Lee, Algernon Sydney, 17. Lee, Anne Hill, 20. Lee, Annie, mentioned, 217, 235. Lee, Cassius F., 29, 30. Lee, Charles Carter, 13, 17. Lee, Charles, 7. Lee, Edmund I., 416. Lee, Francis Lightfoot, 6. Lee genealogy, 21. Lee, General, Fitzhugh, mentioned, 172, 183, 187, 188, 194, 206, 219, 318, 371, 375, 376, 385, 387; letter to, 408. Lee, General George Washington Custis, mentioned, 23, 71, 72, 94, 95, 330