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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 46 6 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 44 6 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 34 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 24 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 22 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 20 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 14 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 13 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Lawton or search for Lawton in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gregg's brigade of South Carolinians in the Second. Battle of Manassas. (search)
ivision was posted as follows: Thomas' brigade of Georgians on our right, behind where the grade of the railroad bed began to rise from a cut to an embankment, and next to them Fields' brigade of Virginians, the right of our divisison. Branch's and Pender's brigade of North Carolinians, and Archer's of Tennesseeans, were held in support of the first line, Branch in the rear of our brigade. So Hill's Light Division was posted and ready for the day's bloody work. Eweli's division, under General Lawton, formed the centre of Jackson's line, and Taliaferro's, under General Starke, was on the extreme right. We had been posted in our position but a few moments, I think, when the crack of the rifles in the woods in our front informed us that our skirmishers had come upon the enemy. We were eagerly listening to the dropping fire in our front, when General Gregg came up to me and telling me that it was desired to feel the enemy and ascertain what the force before us was, but that General
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of the Virginia division Army of Northern Virginia Association. (search)
vision, 5 brigades, 3,008 men; total, 15,294 men. From this number in twenty-six brigades of the forty in Lee's army, the single rule of three will give us 23,523 men as Lee's strength in infantry and artillery at the battle of Sharpsburg. This is, of course, on the supposition that the ratio in the twenty-six brigades was the same for the other twenty-four. Let us examine this by the light from the reports of the brigades themselves, so far as they are given: Robert Ransom's, 1,600; Lawton's, 1,150; Wofford's, 854; Rodes's, 800; Barksdale, 800; Walker, 700; Trimble, 700; Hays, 550; Benning, 400; Cobb, 250; Stonewall, 250; Evans, 209; Kemper, 350; Garnett, 200; total, 8,813. The single rule of three gives the strength of the forty brigades on the ratio of these fourteen, to be 25, 180. So the approximate results reached from the reports of division and brigade commanders differ only by 1,557 men. Now let us see what estimate we can get from the reports of regimental comm