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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 277 3 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 73 11 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 49 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 32 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for A. R. Lawton or search for A. R. Lawton in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
litia, Governor Brown issued an order to Col. A. R. Lawton, commanding the First volunteer regimentt Savannah for the honor of this service. Colonel Lawton selected details from the Chatham artilleruarters without duress. The militia under Colonel Lawton immediately hoisted a State flag—a red lond occupied by Georgia troops, commanded by Colonel Lawton. I was received with great civility, and their possession. A day or two later, Col. A. R. Lawton, in command at Savannah, under instructie of Captain Whiting, refused to recognize Colonel Lawton's authority, or to allow Lieutenant Bassinon Captain Whiting's return, January 28th, Colonel Lawton addressed him the following letter: Sihich was unheeded, Governor Brown directed Colonel Lawton to order out sufficient military force andf New York who own them. Under this order Colonel Lawton, February 8th, put detachments of the Phoe Three more vessels were taken in hand by Colonel Lawton, two of which were advertised for sale, wh
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
companies of Savannah, and commanded by Col. A. R. Lawton. On the appointment of the latter as brupplies. Early in September, 1861, Brig.-Gen. A. R. Lawton, who had been in command of the distrused Governor Brown to add his appeal, and General Lawton was authorized to organize such military f September 25th Secretary Benjamin telegraphed Lawton it was believed the enemy's naval expedition wartow artillery had been ordered to Savannah. Lawton replied: I can do nothing for want of arms, un12-pounder rifled gun should be turned over to Lawton. At this time the latter had an aggregate preary department of Georgia was created, and General Lawton was put in command, with headquarters at S South Carolina, Georgia and east Florida. General Lawton's defensive force now consisted of about 2 added that the personal relations between General Lawton and himself were of such a character as toal for that purpose, adding, I will direct General Lawton to indicate to you where your troops can b[1 more...]
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: (search)
rton. an officer of the old army, of fine reputation as an engineer, was appointed to the command of the department of South Carolina and Georgia. Meanwhile General Lawton had pressed for. ward the work of fortification. Fort Jackson was strengthened, shore batteries were located near it, and the battery at Thunderbolt was protected and reinforced. Toward the last of March scouting parties from the opposing forces encountered each other on Whitemarsh and Wilmington islands. Gen. A. R. Lawton on April 5th officially reported: On two successive nights, March 30th and 31st, scouting parties were sent to Whitemarsh and Wilmington islands from the Thirteentor twelve regiments, eighteen had been furnished. Brig.-Gen. W. D. Smith was assigned to duty in the military district of Georgia, with orders to report to Gen. A. R. Lawton, April 10th. The United States land forces participating in the reduction of Fort Pulaski were under Maj.-Gen. David Hunter and Brigadier-Generals Benham,
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: (search)
led into service under the law of 1860, in companies, battalions, regiments, brigades or divisions, as might be acceptable to the Confederate war department, provided the tender was made before the 15th of January following, and should be consented to by the troops. The question of transfer was submitted to the troops and decided in the negative almost unanimously. This was previous to the conscript act. When that became a law, Governor Brown immediately tendered the State army to Brigadier-General Lawton, commanding the military district of Georgia, Maj.-Gen. Henry R. Jackson, commander of the State army, having retired in order to prevent any embarrassment. Both the governor and General Jackson in addresses to the troops expressed their appreciation of the high character of this distinctively Georgian organization, and the governor in his message in the following November, spoke in the following terms of the excellent spirit, discipline and patriotism prevailing among this body:
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
T. D. Bertody, (B) W. B. Jones, (C) J. C. Wardlaw, (D) W. Talliaferro, (E) J. W. Beck, (F) W. P. Jarrett, (G) John B. Golding (killed), (H) W. H. Stiles, (I) B. F. Fariss, (K) W. H. Howard. This regiment went to Virginia in the spring of 1862 in Lawton's brigade, Jackson's division. It served in the battles around Richmond, the campaign of Second Manassas and Maryland, and at Fredericksburg. After Lawton's appointment as quartermaster-general, Gen. John B. Gordon was assigned to the brigade, Lawton's appointment as quartermaster-general, Gen. John B. Gordon was assigned to the brigade, and subsequently the same command became Evans' brigade. Under these three brigade commanders the regiment served from the battles around Richmond through the Overland campaign, the campaign of Early in Maryland and in the valley, then in the trenches at Petersburg, and finally in Evans' division of Gordon's corps in the campaign that closed at Appomattox. During this long and arduous career the losses of the regiment were very heavy. Some of the successors to the officers already named were:
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
eut. J. M. Mack. Near the middle of June, 1862, Brig.-Gen. A. R. Lawton, with a Georgia brigade consisting of six regiment regiments had been serving on the Georgia coast under General Lawton since the fall of 1861, and some of the troops, especi to do so at the expense of weakening this army. Brigadier-General Lawton with six regiments from Georgia is on the way to y, and with your main body, including Ewell's division and Lawton's and Whiting's commands, move rapidly to Ashland, by railarmy of Northern Virginia, as organized for that campaign, Lawton's brigade became the Fourth of Jackson's division, Jacksoneir ground when half their number had been struck down. Lawton's brigade of the Stonewall division went into action aboute sound of the firing. In the midst of the wood, said General Lawton, I met Major-General Ewell, then hotly engaged, who, a this was supported by the disposition of the troops under Lawton's command. The Thirty-eighth and Thirty-first were for a
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
us brigades were disposed throughout the State. General Upton, who was ordered to Augusta, caused the arrest of Vice-President Stephens, Secretary Mallory and Senator Hill. President Davis arrived at Washington, Ga., the home of Gen. Robert Toombs, May 4, 1865, and remained there about thirty-six hours. His family was with him, consisting of Mrs. Davis and four children, accompanied by her sister, Miss Howell, and Midshipman Howell, her brother. General Bragg, Gen. I. M. St. John, Gen. A. R. Lawton, Postmaster-General John H. Reagan, General Breckinridge, secretary of war, and a considerable number of other Confederate officials and officers, also arrived at Washington. On the 5th this party, the last representatives of the Confederate States government, separated, General Reagan alone accompanying the President in a westward direction. At Irwin's cross-roads and at Dublin they were threatened by strolling bands, but escaped danger. At daylight on the morning of May 10th, a de
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
pril, 1862, he was elected colonel, whereupon he tendered his command to Gen. A. R. Lawton, and from that date his regiment served in the brigade successively commanded by Lawton, Gordon and himself. With the exception of a few months on the defensive lines below Savannah, his entire military service was rendered in the Virginit of the Federal forces and saw two brigades (afterward ascertained to be under Lawton and Winder) advancing to make a front attack upon the regulars. Brig.-Gens. Saken sick with pneumonia, and died on the 27th of February, 1866. Brigadier-General A. R. Lawton Brigadier-General A. R. Lawton, prominently associated with the Brigadier-General A. R. Lawton, prominently associated with the military organization of Georgia in 1861, and the record of her gallant troops in Virginia and Maryland in 1862, at Second Manassas, Harper's Ferry and Sharpsburg perrendered efficient and gallant service. The dispatches that passed between General Lawton at Savannah and General Pemberton at Charleston, in which each exhibits gre