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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
together! No wonder you can't cooperate with a suit of old clothes! It had no agents in the field; it rendered no Lib. 11.37; 12.127. financial accounts. Joshua Leavitt, who had been made its secretary, while continuing to edit the Emancipator, found that it had no vital or organizing power, and at the close of the year was Scoble, who was the Lewis Tappan of the British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society, another specious organization. Lib. 22.9. Extraordinary, we are reminded by Leavitt's unsettling, was the dispersion of those whom hostility to the Liberator had momentarily banded together to break it down. On the occasion of Torrey's valedictoenounce, forced the Mass. Abolition Society to make a shift of securing Mr. Wright's services as editor once more in June, 1841 (Lib. 11.99). He was succeeded by Leavitt as above, and the paper became the Emancipator and Free American (Lib. 11: 191, 203). In 1842 Mr. Wright, in a desperate struggle with poverty, was trying persona
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
to thrive and prevail. Common prudence dictated that Lib. 13.27. it should avert from itself the odium sure to attach to the doctrine of disunion (however qualified) among a Union-worshipping people; that it should assist in fastening the odium on the Old Organization. This course Lib. 12.75, 77. was promptly pursued by the People's Advocate of New Hampshire, which, from being an independent paper under the editorship of St. Clair and others, had shrunk A. St. Clair. to a department in Leavitt's Emancipator. Speaking for the Liberty Party men of Ohio, in distinction from some of their brethren in the East, Salmon P. Chase wrote: We think it better to limit our political action by the political Lib. 12.177. power, explicitly and avowedly, rather than run the risk of misconstruction by saying that we aim at immediate and universal emancipation by political action. We regard the Liberty Party not so much as an abolition organization as a political party, willing to carry out t
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 3: the covenant with death.1843. (search)
er 6, 1843. Ms. I have sent in to you my concluding article on Leavitt, See the whole series of articles, discussing anew the embezzle had the help of D. L. Child, and compelled notice at the hands of Leavitt, Torrey, Elizur Wright, and Lewis Tappan (Lib. 13: 165, 169, 170, 179. I hope will meet with your gracious approbation. This, I Joshua Leavitt. presume, will terminate my editorial labors for the present, aall the tact and technical talent for getting up a good paper that Leavitt has, with as much more Joshua Leavitt. intellectual ability as yoJoshua Leavitt. intellectual ability as you have more moral honesty, and only wanting some of his (pardon me) industry, application, and method. Now we know that you have talent enoo propose to James Gibbons a union meeting at our anniversary, and Leavitt had said in the Emancipator J. Leavitt. that the Society would prJ. Leavitt. that the Society would probably have to call in the help of the old Committee to keep it alive! I thought Garrison's election as President would be as effectual a way
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
who could tell what intentions against the compact when once in power on the innocent pretext of checking the further spread of slavery? While the more advanced Whigs were boldly invoking Ante, p. 93. disunion in case Texas were annexed, Joshua Leavitt, in Ms. Sept. 17, 1844, D. L. Child to W. L. G. Lib. 14.81; cf. 17.14. precious paper, the Boston Morning Chronicle (a short-lived adjunct of the Emancipator), refused to pledge himself or the Liberty Party to any such course. As a politici. These not even the refusal of French to print in the Herald the overwhelmingly adverse Lib. 14.199. decision of the Society, nor his abrupt discontinuance of Lib. 14.199. the paper and refusal to surrender the subscription lists, following Leavitt's Emancipator example, could disenchant. A new schism resulted, of limited extent though marked by bitter feeling, and was fostered by the New-Organization and Liberty-Party spirit, ever intent on Lib. 15.55, 70, 78. profiting by dissensions i
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
ly son E. Quincy. Of him who bearded Jefferson,— A non-resistant by conviction, But with a bump in contradiction, So that whene'er it gets a chance His pen delights to play the lance, And—you may doubt it or believe it— Full at the head of Joshua Leavitt The very calumet he'd launch, And scourge him with the olive-branch. A master with the foils of wit, 'T is natural he should love a hit; A gentleman, withal, and scholar, Only base things excite his choler, And then his satire's keen and thins, speaking both for New York and for Massachusetts. In Maine the State Convention admitted that the party there merely held its own, and looked forward to certain death for the party at large if the stationary stage were not quickly escaped—Joshua Leavitt himself Lib. 16.57. being present, and discounting the impending catastrophe by denying that the party and the ballot-box were the sole Cf. ante, 2.310. means of abolishing slavery. Bailey gave a discouraging account of the Ohio section,
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 7: first Western tour.—1847. (search)
s prophesied that when pressed it would be forced to gain strength by selecting for candidates men not of their party. Leavitt, desirous to equal Goodell, is about to select Hale as their Presidential candidate —a man never of their party. It was noted by Mr. Wright. Two days and nights were consumed by the Convention Lib. 17.185. in adjusting differences. Joshua Leavitt led the Eastern wing, with the aid of Henry B. Stanton, whose politician's progress had been shown in January at a Lie miserable scamps jumping upon their backs to ride Cf. ante, 2.311. into office. Quite naturally at Buffalo he joined Leavitt in contending that the Liberty Party was not a permanent party, whereas Gerrit Smith and the Liberty Leaguers insisted tl the interests which ought to be represented in a civil government, in order to put them in practice on taking office. Leavitt was likewise in opposition to Goodell and Gerrit Smith and Lib. 17.186; 18.14. Lysander Spooner on the question of the
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
ns, Henry B. Stanton was authorized to say that John P. Hale would submit to the action of the Convention; and when Van Buren led largely on the first ballot, Joshua Leavitt completed the suicide of the Liberty Party by moving that Van Buren's nomination be made unanimous. The Liberty Party began well and ended badly. . . . With the desertion of it by Mr. Leavitt, Mr. Stanton, Lewis Tappan, and others, I had no sympathy. Mr. Leavitt's prominent part in the nominating of Van Buren was very offensive to me (Ms. November 26, 1870, Gerrit Smith to W. L. G.). The Free Soil Party exists, wrote Quincy, Lib. 18.146. not because, but in spite of the Liberty PartMr. Leavitt's prominent part in the nominating of Van Buren was very offensive to me (Ms. November 26, 1870, Gerrit Smith to W. L. G.). The Free Soil Party exists, wrote Quincy, Lib. 18.146. not because, but in spite of the Liberty Party. Van Buren had already come out against any further Lib. 18.102. enlargement of the slave area, affirming the power of Congress in the premises, and refusing to support either Lewis Cass or Zachary Taylor. He had at once received the nomination of the Barnburners' Convention at Utica, which was thus imposed upon the Buffalo
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 13: the Bible Convention.—1853. (search)
itude towards slavery, under the compromises of the Constitution, certainly had not been acceptable to the abolitionists; but his solitary courage amid a contemptuous and murderous pro-slavery body like the Senate of the United States deserved, and had always received, recognition in the Liberator. Mr. Lib. 23:[83]. Garrison, therefore, took his place without scruple beside Charles Sumner, John G. Palfrey, Horace Mann, Henry Wilson, Anson Burlingame, Richard H. Dana, Jr., John Jay, and Joshua Leavitt. On Cassius Clay's offering the toast—The True Union: To Benton, to Bryant, to T. H. Benton. W. C. Bryant. W. H. Seward. H. Greeley. Seward, to Greeley, to Garrison, to Phillips, to Quincy— the union of all the opponents of the propaganda of slavery, there were loud calls for Garrison, who responded with peculiar felicity, paying just tributes to Hale and to Lib. 23.74. Clay, The first meeting of Garrison and C. M. Clay, whenever it took place, was not as early as 1844, as the latt
e we were yet sinners, Christ died for us. This New Testament argument, met with unsigned, would probably in no quarter of Christendom suggest anything but a Christian origin. But in this very year a book reviewer was allowed, in the N. Y. Independent of Jan. 3, 1856, to say: Of the converts to Spiritualism whose previous belief is mentioned in this book, almost all of them were infidels, and some of them, like Garrison and Robert Owen, of a most degraded class (Lib. 26: 22, 51). Joshua Leavitt, D. D., was at this time the office editor of the Independent, which, for the rest, had an honorable distinction among the religious press for its views on slavery. The editorial board consisted of Joseph P. Thompson, D. D., Leonard Bacon, D. D., and Richard S. Storrs, D. D. Henry Ward Beecher was the most prominent contributor. In the course of the summer Dr. Bacon, addressing an Evangelical Association, professed his antipathy to political preaching. For example, he did not believe in