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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 59 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 47 1 Browse Search
Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 26 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 17 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 1 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 6 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for A. L. Lee or search for A. L. Lee in all documents.

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m, of the Nineteenth Kentucky, to report to General Lee at daylight, at Robinson's Mill. The balant Hill on the same day. The forces under General Lee, moving in our advance, met the enemy earlynate as to hold them in complete check, and General Lee, who was now within five miles of Mansfieldar and completely blocking up the road, was General Lee's train of some two hundred and fifty wagonupon this point. First, the forces under General Lee were decoyed into an advance too far beyond of a hill on the farm of Dr. Wilson. General A. L. Lee ordered Colonel Robinson, commanding therd with all possible despatch. Generals Stone, Lee, and Ransom rode to the front and carefully recnd a hurrying cavalryman. The capture of General Lee's headquarters train was attended with muchthes and other fixins. Colonel Brisbin, of General Lee's staff, lost some five hundred dollars' woetiring lines was the greatest, reported to General Lee for duty with three men, whom he had rallie[13 more...]
s whole command. The tactical ability displayed by General Custer, is spoken of in the most complimentary terms. There can now be no impropriety in disclosing the object of the late movement. It is doubtless generally known that the reconnaissance by Custer, supported by infantry, was a simple diversion in favor of Kilpatrick, who has not yet returned from his raid in the direction of Richmond. That the attention of the enemy has, to a considerable degree, been drawn to the left wing of Lee's army by Custer's demonstration, is confirmed by rebel prisoners, who report their officers to have been in a great state of trepidation, believing a monster raid in progress on their left. Confirmation is also had in the fact that a large number of troops were concentrated around Charlottesville to resist our advance. Among our captures are sixty prisoners and a number of valuable horses. Three flouring-mills, six caissons, two forges, a complete set of artillery-harness, and eight wag