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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 59 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 47 1 Browse Search
Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 26 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 17 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 1 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 6 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for A. L. Lee or search for A. L. Lee in all documents.

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seven o'clock on Thursday morning, capturing three guns, one captain, one lieutenant, fifty-four enlisted men, and killing forty of the enemy. No loss whatever on our side sustained in this engagement. 3. A cavalry expedition under Brigadier-General A. L. Lee, reached Clinton on Thursday morning at seven o'clock, capturing forty-seven prisoners, the rebel mails, telegraph office, &c., and a considerable quantity of stores and ammunition. Among the prisoners captured is Lieutenant-Colonel Pties of corn and meal were destroyed, and the telegraph operator and many important despatches captured. Camp Moore, with a large amount of clothing and gray cloth, was likewise destroyed, and over two hundred fine horses and mules captured. General Lee returned to Baton Rouge at noon yesterday, followed by a large number of negroes. 4. Lieutenant I. N. Earl, Fourth Wisconsin cavalry, commanding a special permanent scouting party of twenty-five men, having learned of an intended attempt to
tes for a regiment to perform its part, and the whole was accomplished nearly as fast as the column could move. It is only necessary to remind the public of what is already known, viz.: The fact that this railroad is now the only one upon which Lee could depend for communication with the south, south-east and south-west, and the only route by which he could bring up troops or supplies to Richmond or Petersburg; and this being remembered, it is easy to appreciate the vast importance of the deption, it is doubtful whether they will succeed in reconstructing this railroad before the present campaign is decided. The Weldon road, although but a small portion of it is torn up, is equally unavailable, and practically the rebel army under Lee, and the rebel Government are isolated by an interval of many miles from all railroad communication with the interior of rebeldom. To return to the narrative of the raid. The force arrived in the vicinity of Staunton bridge, on the afternoon o