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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 3 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
guns, and opened upon the intruders, who ceased working, and did not return to that place again. It was a calm, starlight night, no breeze was stirring, and the booming of the Napoleon guns was echoed and re-echoed among the distant hills. The infantry, who lay in the ditches, were aroused from their slumbers by the sudden firing, and sprang up at once along the line, muskets in hand, and ready for action. On the 31st, Corporal Thomas Jones was killed by a random picket shot, and Private A. Lee wounded by the same ball. These men belonged to first detachment of the battery, the same that had suffered so severely at the battle of Resaca. The body of Corporal Jones was buried on a small ridge three hundred yards in rear of the line, and Lieutenant Ritter cut his name on a small piece of board, and placed it at the head of the grave. Early in the afternoon of the same day, Lieutenant Ritter went to a spring about a hundred yards in front of the line, to get some water. While
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
guns, and opened upon the intruders, who ceased working, and did not return to that place again. It was a calm, starlight night, no breeze was stirring, and the booming of the Napoleon guns was echoed and re-echoed among the distant hills. The infantry, who lay in the ditches, were aroused from their slumbers by the sudden firing, and sprang up at once along the line, muskets in hand, and ready for action. On the 31st, Corporal Thomas Jones was killed by a random picket shot, and Private A. Lee wounded by the same ball. These men belonged to first detachment of the battery, the same that had suffered so severely at the battle of Resaca. The body of Corporal Jones was buried on a small ridge three hundred yards in rear of the line, and Lieutenant Ritter cut his name on a small piece of board, and placed it at the head of the grave. Early in the afternoon of the same day, Lieutenant Ritter went to a spring about a hundred yards in front of the line, to get some water. While
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of the Lee Memorial Association. (search)
Dr. Pendleton. The mausoleum proper, which has but recently been finished, rests upon a crypt of heavy masonry, containing twenty-odd repositories for burial-cases. Into this crypt the remains of General and Mrs. Lee and their daughter, Miss Agnes Lee, were removed several weeks ago. The exterior of the superstructure, in accordance with the plan agreed upon, is severely plain, the material being ordinary building brick. The interior, or monumental chamber, is reached by a short flight ofleton, Paxton and others were also decorated. At General Pendleton's grave were stationed two pieces of artillery. The Confederate battle-flags, made of immortelles, which the youngest daughter of President Davis sent to decorate the graves of Lee and Jackson, (and which were appropriately placed on them by Miss Carrie Daniel, the bright ten-year-old daughter of the orator of the day) were very beautiful, and were very much admired, as were all of the floral decorations, which reflected gre