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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 4 0 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 2 0 Browse Search
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John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 10: last days with the tribune (search)
ratic writer's poems in his first edition, that fact was regarded as conclusive evidence of a sectional bias even in literature. Inasmuch, however, as Poe was born in Boston, and received much of his fragmentary education at West Point, the criticism did but little harm to Dana or the book. It must be confessed, however, that a sharp review in one of the magazines had the merit of calling Dana's attention anew to the whole list of American poets, which resulted in the selection of Poe's Annabel Lee, The Bells, and The Raven, as well as many others from both native and foreign authors, for the next and subsequent editions of the work. The Household Book has been frequently imitated under one name or another. It was thoroughly revised by Dana in 1884, has gone through many editions, and still justly holds its place as the best volume of the kind published in the English language. It is to be observed, however, that the compiler's modesty was too great to permit him to include even
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 14: Poe (search)
least one new tale, and several new poems, including the lines For Annie, Eldorado, a revised and much enlarged version of The bells, and the last of his poems, Annabel Lee. In the summer of 1849 he went to Richmond, where he renewed his addresses to the sweetheart of his boyhood, Miss Royster, now the widow Mrs. Shelton and wealthich must be included the earlier lines To Helen, Israfel, The city in the sea, the Sleeper, The Haunted Palace, Dream-Land, The Raven, Ulalume, For Annie, and Annabel Lee. And most of his earlier verses are manifestly imitative, Byron and Moore and Coleridge and Shelley being his chief models; while much of his earlier work, incuse of symbolism. It is idle to complain that his best verses—as Israfel or The haunted Palace —are superficial; and it is futile to contend that such poems as Annabel Lee or the sonnet To My mother are not sincere, or that his poems, one and all, lack spontaneity. But it is not to be denied that some of his best-known poems—as L<
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: poets of the Civil War I (search)
ines, upon the gallant officer commemorated by Boker in the Dirge for a soldier. Thomas Dunn English's The charge by the Ford and Melville's Malvern Hill deal with the later events of McClellan's first campaign. Lincoln's call for new troops gave rise to the sentimental but immensely effective Three hundred thousand more by James Sloan Gibbons and to Bret Harte's The Reveille (sometimes called The Drum), which is said to have played a large part in holding California loyal. The advance of Lee to Antietam, his repulse there, and his retreat found a record in Whittier's Barbara Frietchie, Melville's The Victor of Antietam, Boker's The crossing at Fredericksburg, John Boyle O'Reilly's At Fredericksburg, and Aldrich's exquisite sonnets Fredericksburg and By the Potomac. Meanwhile the war in the West was not without its poet— annalists, of whom the most notable perhaps was Forceythe Willson (1837-67), a native of New York who lived in Indiana from 1852 to 1864 and wrote Union editor
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
e pieces, prose and poetical, the, 161 American quarterly review, the, 163 American scholar, the, 20, 265 American Stationers' Company, 127 American universal magazine, the, 161 American War ballads, 304 Amherst College, 214 Among My books, 247 Amory, Susan, 124 Amy Wentworth, 48 Anacreon, 3, 9 Analogy (Butler), 197 Andover review, the, 208 Andover, Seminary, 208, 210 Andrew, Jane, 405 Angel of the Church, the, 308 Angels of Buena Vista, the, 48 Annabel Lee, 60, 66, 67 Annals of America, 225 Annals of Quodlibet, 152 Annals of the American Revolution, 115 Anne, Queen of England, 348 Annie Laurie, 275, 298 Annual register, the, 104, 105 Antiquities of the Southern Indians, Particularly of the Georgia Tribes, 317 Appeal to Pharaoh, an, 325 Apple Pie and Cheese, 243 Appleton, Frances Elizabeth, 36 Arabian nights, 260 Argonaut, the, 387 Argus, the (Croswell, E.), 183 Argus of Western America, the (Kendall, G. W.),
l lyric is to Poe the only true type of poetry; a long poem does not exist. Readers who respond more readily to auditory than to visual or motor stimulus are therefore Poe's chosen audience. For them he executes, like Paganini, marvels upon his single string. He has easily recognizable devices: the dominant note, the refrain, the repetend, that is to say the phrase which echoes, with some variation, a phrase or line already used. In such poems as To Helen, Israfel, the haunted Palace, Annabel Lee, the theme, the tone, the melody all weave their magic spell; it is like listening to a lute-player in a dream. That the device often turns into a trick is equally true. In The Bells and The Raven we detect the prestidigitator. It is jugglery, though such juggling as only a master-musician can perform. In Ulalume and other show-pieces the wires get crossed and the charm snaps, scattering tinsel fragments of nonsense verse. Such are the dangers of the technical temperament unenriche
25-42; journalism, 60-62; education, 62-63; science, 63-64; bibliography of the literature, 269-270 American colonists, predominantly English, 12-25; motives for emigration, 16; moulded by pioneer life, 17-23; in 1760, 59-60 American idea, 206-207 American life since the Civil War, 234 et seq. American literature, the term, 6 American Mercury, 61 American scholar, the, Emerson 123 Ames, Fisher, 88 Among my books, Lowell 170 Andrew Rykman's Prayer, Whittier 161 Annabel Lee, Poe 192 Anthologies, American, 269 Arsenal at Springfield, the, Longfellow 156 Assignation, the, Poe 193 Astoria, Irving 91 Atala, Chateaubriand 96 Atlantic monthly, 161, 167, 170, 250, 257 Autobiography, Franklin 58-59 Autocrat of the Breakfast table, the, Holmes 164, 167 Bacchus, Emerson 129 Ballad of the French Fleet, a, Longfellow 155 Bancroft, George, 89,176, 177-78 Barefoot boy, the, Whittier 158 Bartol, C. A., 115 Battle Hymn of the Republic, Howe