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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for B. H. Lee or search for B. H. Lee in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg. (search)
I—Lieutenant J. W. Hall, Privates W. Belote, E. H. Tomblin, William Stringheard. Company K—Privates H. C. Grosventine, L. F. Walker, R. N. Batten, W. Hodge. Company L—Privates T. H. Sutton, E. Dampier. Company M—Lieutenant J. D. Perkins, Sergeant J. Betton, Privates Herndons B. M. Hora, S. Dimmock, R. W. Sirles, H. C. Billingsby, W. W. Shuman, N. A. Armstrong, P. Conniff. Fifth Florida. Company A—Lieutenant G. L. Odum, Privates R. H. McClelland, D. M. Claytor, M. D. Pratton, B. H. Lee, Robert Potts, John F. Cooper. Company B—Privates J. R. Richard, J. Niblack, P. Morgan, John Field, T. S. Geer, M. Coon. Company C—Privates Wiley Atkinson, D. C. Isler, J. R. Sutton, W. D. Smith, H. Norris, J. W. French, J. W. Howell, H. Stanford, C. Allegood, M. Dudley. Company D—Lieutenant J. A. Shaw, Privates G. F. Devane, A. D. Dutton, J. R. Robertson, J. M. Hindley, J. N. Morgan. Company E—Privates W. Carson, J. W. Johnson, Isaiah Jones, B. W. Moseley, E. Hudson
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Colonel John Bowie Magruder. (search)
overnor Curtin and General Wool both testify that these men—ragged, shoeless, half-fed—passed through the country without making depredations or taking anything without offering to pay for what they took, even if it were in Confederate scrip. General Lee's order had been issued to that effect, and though hungry, the men observed his request. It is for the future historian to compare such an order and the character of the man who issued it and the men who observed it, with the vandalism of Butler, Sherman, and Sheridan and their men. These were not men to be ashamed of, even if some of them did straggle, and when those who were on hand when General Lee marshalled his forces on that 17th day of September, with an army, variously estimated at from 35,000 to 40,000 men, to cope with General McClellan, with about 90,000 to 120,000 men (see his report in Vol. XIX, War of Rebellion, dated September 20, 1862; also Long's Memoirs of Robert E. Lee, page 220), every man who answered roll-cal
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.33 (search)
overnor Curtin and General Wool both testify that these men—ragged, shoeless, half-fed—passed through the country without making depredations or taking anything without offering to pay for what they took, even if it were in Confederate scrip. General Lee's order had been issued to that effect, and though hungry, the men observed his request. It is for the future historian to compare such an order and the character of the man who issued it and the men who observed it, with the vandalism of Butler, Sherman, and Sheridan and their men. These were not men to be ashamed of, even if some of them did straggle, and when those who were on hand when General Lee marshalled his forces on that 17th day of September, with an army, variously estimated at from 35,000 to 40,000 men, to cope with General McClellan, with about 90,000 to 120,000 men (see his report in Vol. XIX, War of Rebellion, dated September 20, 1862; also Long's Memoirs of Robert E. Lee, page 220), every man who answered roll-cal