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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 40 0 Browse Search
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
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Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 13: Chancellorsville (search)
hundred-day men, from New Haven, Conn. General Lee, convinced that there was, for the present ous shout of Bob Stiles from many throats. General Lee called me to him and asked whether I reallyShortly after I left General McLaws, he and General Lee resumed their conference, and, just as theyting from exertion. When his eye fell upon General Lee he made directly for him, and I followed asr seen anything more majestically calm than General Lee was; I felt painfully the contrast between his horse. Unfortunately, I had none of General Lee's power over him, and he began to pour out the calamity. In vain I suggested that General Lee could not be ignorant of all this; that his have found means to communicate with him; that Lee had beaten Hooker and his calm and self-reliantn. While we were thus debating the matter, General Lee finished with McLaws, who at once started h quite appreciate the marked peculiarity of General Lee's allusion to Sedgwick, but, as I now under[4 more...]
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), I. First months (search)
command of the Army of the Potomac, followed on Lee's right flank, covered Washington, and crossed e magnificent Confederate charge under Pickett, Lee was forced to retreat. Meade followed him, butggons. [That evening there was a report that Lee was falling back. The cavalry were gathered foit is to raise 30,000. He said yesterday: If Bob Lee will go into those fields there and fight me,e heaviest musketry fire, than hold my place! Lee, finding that he could not outflank Meade, fellou men enough, sir? What are the intentions of Lee, sir? How are the prospects of the rebellion, eneral Meade received imperative orders to give Lee battle; not a word of truth in it! You might aders to catch a sea-gull with a pinch of salt. Lee would perhaps have given us a chance; but the seade's move can't be beat. Did I tell you that Lee passed through Warrenton and passed a night. H have roared for the safety of Jeff Davis and Bob Lee! . . . October 28, 1863 . . . The guerill[10 more...]
sitting in his tent smoking and talking to one of his staff-officers. The stranger approached the chieftain, and inquired of him as follows: General, if you flank Lee and get between him and Richmond, will you not uncover Washington, and leave it a prey to the enemy? General Grant, discharging a cloud of smoke from his mouth, indifferently replied: Yes, I reckon so. The stranger, encouraged by a reply, propounded question number two: General, do you not think Lee can detach sufficient force from his army to reinforce Beauregard and overwhelm Butler? Not a doubt of it, replied the General. Becoming fortified by his success, the stranger propounded question number three, as follows: General, is there not dancer that Johnston may come up and reinforce Lee, so that the latter will swing round and cut off your conmunications, and seize your supplies? Very likely, was L the cool reply of the General, and he knocked the ashes from the end of his cigar. The stranger, horrified at the
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Letter from three good little boys. (search)
is so Bad and we are getting so Weak in our Joynts. We know that the Fellows in old Mr. Northup's office says the People is to Blame. But that is the way all fellows do that Neglect their Bisness. They try to throw the Blame on somebody Else, Because if they did not throw the Blame on somebody Else, they would have to be Punished for their Faults and at the same time to confess that their Punishment was Just. But this Goes Against the Grain, especially of the Fellows that Does Wrong. Either old Mr. Northup and his fellows aint got the sense to Manage their bisness or else they have neglected it. Any way, they Ought to Quit and Make room for a New Sett. If they dont, us Boys will Starve, the Yankees will whip us, and then You all Hoam Fokes will Ketch the Verry Devil. Hoping, dearest Pa, that you will Atend to this Right Away, we sign our names, with all love and Duty. Your affectionate sons, Bob Lee Gus Bowrygard Joe Jonsing. To Mr Deff Javis, Esq Richmond, Virginia.
Richmond. Can it be taken, General? asked one of these. With ease, was the response. By the Peninsula? continued the querist. No, replied the General. If I had charge of the matter, I would want two large armies; one to move directly on Lee, and the other to land at City Point, and cut communications to the southward. Lee would be then compelled to fall back, and the army from the North could press, and, if possible, defeat him. If he would open up communications again with the CLee would be then compelled to fall back, and the army from the North could press, and, if possible, defeat him. If he would open up communications again with the Cotton States, he must fight the army south of the James; and to do this, he must cross his whole force, otherwise he could be defeated in detail. If he did so cross, the Northern army could take Richmond; if he did not, that from the South could move up the heights south of the James, and shell and destroy the city. I communicated this fact to two confidential friends the day Grant was first called to Washington, and now for the first time make it public. At the time the remarks were made
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.12 (search)
n, having come into possession of a copy of General Lee's order of march, found at or near General of South Mountain, or Boonsboro; fought by General Lee to protect his trains and to enable Generaluntain at Crampton's and Turner's Gaps, and General Lee drew up his army on the west side of Antietand his failure to attack on the 16th, when General Lee's army was still divided, was fatal to his nt on in our front all that day. That night General Lee withdrew his whole army quietly without losber of General McClellan's army, with which General Lee fought this battle. Colonel Allan says (page 380): Lee's entire infantry force was under 30,000, to which should be added his cavalry and artes with less than 40,000 men, quoting from General Lee's report. Even this allowance is an overesred greater hardships or went through more than Lee's army in the late summer and early fall of 186time to wave my hand at my old school-fellow, Bob Lee, a private in the battery, the son of our Com[2 more...]