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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 6 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 2 0 Browse Search
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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Left flank movement across the Chickahominy and James-General Lee-visit to Butler-the movement on Petersburg-the investment of Petersburg (search)
s North with equal vehemence, was calculated to give him the entire confidence of his troops and to make him feared by his antagonists. It was not an uncommon thing for my staff-officers to hear from Eastern officers, Well, Grant has never met Bobby Lee yet. There were good and true officers who believe now that the Army of Northern Virginia was superior to the Army of the Potomac man to man. I do not believe so, except as the advantages spoken of above made them so. Before the end I believee his troops really got off from there. While there I informed General Butler that Hancock's corps would cross the river and move to Petersburg to support Smith in case the latter was successful, and that I could reinforce there more rapidly than Lee could reinforce from his position. I returned down the river to where the troops of the Army of the Potomac now were, communicated to General Meade, in writing, the directions I had given to General Butler and directed him (Meade) to cross Han
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Raid on the Virginia Central Railroad-raid on the Weldon Railroad-Early's movement upon Washington-mining the works before Petersburg-explosion of the mine before Petersburg- campaign in the Shenandoah Valley-capture of the Weldon Railroad (search)
killing and wounding a good many men. After the battle he formed a junction at Staunton with Averell and Crook, who had come up from the Kanawha, or Gauley River. It was supposed, therefore, that General Hunter would be about Charlottesville, Virginia, by the time Sheridan could get there, doing on the way the damage that he was sent to do. I gave Sheridan instructions to have Hunter, in case he should meet him about Charlottesville, join and return with him to the Army of the Potomac. Lee, hearing of Hunter's success in the valley, started Breckinridge out for its defence at once. Learning later of Sheridan's going with two divisions, he also sent Hampton with two divisions of cavalry, his own and Fitz-Hugh Lee's. Sheridan moved to the north side of the North Anna to get out west, and learned of the movement of these troops to the south side of the same stream almost as soon as they had started. He pushed on to get to Trevilian Station to commence his destruction at tha
xpressed to Warren my fears that the cavalry might expend all their ammunition before the attack could be made, that the sun would go down before the battle could be begun, or that troops from Lee's right, which, be it remembered, was less than three miles away from my right, might, by striking my rear, or even by threatening it, prevent the attack on Pickett. Warren did not seem to me to be at all solicitous; his manner exhibited decided apathy, and he remarked with indifference that Bobby Lee was always getting people into trouble. With unconcern such as this, it is no wonder that fully three hours time was consumed in marching his corps fromJ. Boisseau's to Gravelly Run Church; though the distance was but two miles. However, when my patience was almost worn out, Warren reported his troops ready, Ayres's division being formed on the west side of the Gravelly Church road, Crawford's on the east side, and Griffin in reserve behind the right of Crawford, a little different from