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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 7 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 6: siege of Knoxville.--operations on the coasts of the Carolinas and Georgia. (search)
emory of Lieutenant Huntington Smith, Twentieth Michigan. Battery Clifton Lee, east of Fort H. Smith, in memory of Captain Clifton Lee, One Hundred and Twelfth Illinois Mounted Infantry. Fort Hill, at the extreme eastern point of the Union lines, ind traveled the Lafayette road, visiting on the way the position of General Thomas, near Kelly's Farm, See page 134. and Lee and Gordon's Mill. See page 134. We rode on to Crawfish Spring, See page 133. and there, in the cool shadow of the t His force consisted of the brigade of General Wessel, of Peck's division; the brigades of Colonels Amory, Stevenson, and Lee; the Third New York and First Rhode Island Batteries, with sections of the Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth New York Indepenn watching the railway communications between Virginia and the Carolinas, that they could not well be spared to re-enforce Lee or others. At the middle of January, 1863. he sent out Colonel Mix, with his Third New York Cavalry, to raid through the
on, between our reenforcements and Longstreet. A party of citizens from Sevierville report no appearance of the enemy in that direction. It is rumored to-day that Lee is advancing with the bulk of his army — having abandoned Richmond and removed the capital to Montgomery. Amid all these rumors we are quietly awaiting orders. The desperate straits to which rebeldom is driven by the summer and fall campaigns, give plausibility to any story, however improbable. Should Lee be able to aid Longstreet by any concatenation of military circumstances, we will, probably, be obliged to make different arrangements. Till then, we feel quite comfortable in the hope oth, Twentieth Michigan volunteer infantry, who fell at the battle of Campbell's Station. Battery Clifton Lee--East of Fort Huntington Smith, in memory of Captain Clifton Lee, One Hundred and Twelfth Illinois mounted infantry, who fell in the fight of November eighteenth, in front of Fort Sanders. Fort Hill--At the extreme eas
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.44 (search)
euben Dawson, Rodger M. Dunaway, R..A. Dunton, Frederick Eubank, B. Eastham, J. P. Gayle, M. J. Gayle, Thos. B. Gayle, Lewis E. Gooding, J. H. Goddin, Abner Goodall, James J. Gooch, James R. Gresham, John B. Griffith, H. Gaskins, James Haney, Francis L. Hill, Noah Holkman, H. H. Hopkins, R. T. Howard, Isaiah Hunton, Jacob Imboden, Matthew Jennings, C. W. Johnson, M. A. Jones, W. M. Yerby, John C. Rally, Hugh C. Keysear, James P. Kite, Richard Knox, Thomas O. Kite, M. P. Lacy, T. B. Leach, Clifton Lee, J. W. Limbrick, D. W. Lowe, Willis J. Landram, Edward G. Leavell, Fielding Lucas, Wm. L. Manley, Elimonder Myers, O. D. Miller, J. M. Milton, L. E. Meredith, John L. McKenny, William Norris, John J. Porter, John T. Pritchard, James H. Peebles, Geo. H. Priest, Thomas Parr, Rupert R. Powell, H. F. Powell, Jno. R. Paine, Thos. H. Riley, Daniel Reeves, S. B. Rollins, John M. Royston, J. E. Ricketts, T. R. Ridgely, Robert Scott, J. A. Silman, John A. Silman, J. G. Smoot, Jas. W. Strother, Joh