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The Daily Dispatch: January 2, 1863., [Electronic resource] 16 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 31, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 2, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Columbus Lee or search for Columbus Lee in all documents.

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ny to dispose of.--The Supreme Court of Appeals adjourned to meet on the 5th inst. Mayor's Court Thursday, January 1, 1863.--The new year commenced with a small attendance at Court, and but few criminals in the dock. Henry Krebbs and Columbus Lee, heretofore-arrested in a house on 14th street and held as suspicious characters, without visible means of support, were brought up for an examination, which, on the part of Krebbs, concluded with his discharge. Lee was required to give $300 Lee was required to give $300 security for his good demeanor, but took an appeal from the judgment of the Major to the Hustings Court. Russell F. Smith and Ro. E. Haslett were arraigned for assaulting C. D. S. Stewart, a post-office clerk, a few days since, on 11th street. In this case the parties arrested were charged with also violating the duelling not by carrying a challenge. The case was continued until Friday. Ella, slave of Julius Bumgardner, was arraigned for stealing a lot of called and other articles fr
The Daily Dispatch: January 2, 1863., [Electronic resource], The capture of steamers by the Virginia State Line. (search)
own corps of 30,000 men. That is to say, he wished tomorrow his corps on this side of the river, while Burnside was on the other, without pontoons and with no possible means of communicating with him. We wonder how long it would have been before Gen. Lee had put the whole concern in his breathes pocket. But says this modest General, with thirty thousand men I could have chosen a position which the whole Confederate army could not have taken. Is it possible? The Confederates, with but a portio The Confederates, with but a portion of their army, carried position alter position around this city, all of them believed to be impregnable. Hocker ought to know that, for he made use of his legs on most of those occasions, often enough to have kept it in his memory. Thirty thousand Yankees delay the whole Confederate army !!!.There are said to be 200,000 men in Stafford, and Lee is just across the river. Hocker is hiding for the command of the General Army. We hope be will get it.
vaporing declaration that he remained two days at Fredericksburg after the repulse of his arms, ready to give battle to Gen. Lee, but that Gen. Lee did not attack him. Why did he not attack Gen. Lee! Has he forgotten that on the night of the battleGen. Lee did not attack him. Why did he not attack Gen. Lee! Has he forgotten that on the night of the battle he rent a dispatch to his Government stating that on the next morning he should attack Gen. Lee again? Now he pretends that he was waiting for an attack. If he was very anxious for it, why could he not will a little longer, instead of stealing offGen. Lee! Has he forgotten that on the night of the battle he rent a dispatch to his Government stating that on the next morning he should attack Gen. Lee again? Now he pretends that he was waiting for an attack. If he was very anxious for it, why could he not will a little longer, instead of stealing off like a thief in the night? This is the second time Gen. Burnside has fled from Fredericksburg. The Yankees will hardly trust him, in spite of his excuses, to lead their army a third time. Gen. Lee again? Now he pretends that he was waiting for an attack. If he was very anxious for it, why could he not will a little longer, instead of stealing off like a thief in the night? This is the second time Gen. Burnside has fled from Fredericksburg. The Yankees will hardly trust him, in spite of his excuses, to lead their army a third time.