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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 44: the lack of food and the prices in the Confederacy. (search)
ith gun blacking. Shoes, $125 to $150. Ink was made of elderberries; flour cost $300 a barrel. February 10, 1863.-General Lee wrote to the Secretary of War, on January 22d, that his army was not fed well enough to fit them for the exertions of tter was referred to the Commissary-General, who, after the usual delay, returned it with a long argument to show that General Lee was in error, and that the practice was necessary, etc. To this the Secretary responded by a peremptory order, resarter, else many in this community will famish. About noon to-day, a despatch came from Lieutenant-Colonel Cole, General Lee's principal commissary, at Orange Court House, dated 12th inst., saying the army was out of meat, and had but one day' was $900 a barrel; bacon and lard fell to $8.25 a pound; corn, $12 a bushel; fodder, $12 a cwt. Breakfast, $10. In General Lee's tent meat was eaten twice a week. His bill of fare was a head of cabbage boiled in salt water, sweet potatoes, and
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 7.83 (search)
Lieutenant-General Pemberton at Vicksburg, and that of General Bragg in Tennessee, were placed under General Joseph E. Johnston, and his official headquarters were established at Chattanooga. Immediately thereafter General Johnston visited Murfreesboro‘, where he passed some days devoted to a thorough inspection of the army. Our forces numbered somewhat over 40,000 men. General Johnston's visit, was followed during the second week in December by that of President Davis and his aide, General Custis Lee. The President asked Bragg if he did not think he could spare a division of his army to reeforce Pemberton. Buildings at Murfreesboro‘. from photographs. 1. General Rosecrans's Headquarters. 2. Christian Church, used as a post chapel by the Union army. 3. Soule Female College, used as a hospital. 4. Headquarters of General Bragg; afterward of Generals Thomas and Garfield. 5. Union University, used as a hospital. Bragg assented and dispatched a division of 8000 men under
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Lee's report of the surrender at Appomattox. (search)
ected with Mahone's division, forming the rear of Longstreet. The enemy's cavalry penetrated the line of march through the interval thus left, and attacked the wagon-train moving toward Farmville. This caused serious delay in the march of the center and rear of the column, and enabled the enemy to mass upon their flank. After successive attacks Anderson's and Ewell's corps were captured or driven from their position. The latter general, with both of his division commanders, Kershaw and Custis Lee, and his brigadiers, were taken prisoners. Gordon, who all the morning, aided by General W. F. Lee's cavalry, had checked the advance of the enemy on the road from Amelia Springs and protected the trains, became exposed to his combined assaults, which he bravely resisted and twice repulsed; but the cavalry having been withdrawn to another part of the line of march, . . . the enemy, massing heavily on his [Gordon's] front and both flanks, renewed the attack about 6 P. M., and drove him fro
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Appomattox campaign. (search)
. At the end of February, 1865 (according to the inspection reports), the Army of Northern Virginia had 3005 officers and 43,052 men of infantry and cavalry present effective for the field. The artillery at this time probably numbered 5000, Custis Lee's division in the defenses of Richmond 3000, and Rosser's cavalry (which joined in March) 2000. After making due allowance for losses at Fort Stedman and along the lines up to March 28th, the effective strength of Lee's army at the beginning oich joined in March) 2000. After making due allowance for losses at Fort Stedman and along the lines up to March 28th, the effective strength of Lee's army at the beginning of the campaign is estimated as follows: cavalry, 5000; artillery, 5000; infantry, 44,000 = 54,000. This does not include local troops and naval forces, of which no data are obtainable. Graves of Union soldiers at City Point. From a War-time photograph. View of Goldsboro‘, North Carolina. From a War-time sketch.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 18.113 (search)
, via Atlanta, Savannah, and Columbia, we were to have the honor of taking part in the capture of Lee's army and the capital of the Confederacy. The next day brought us news which dispelled this happy vision. Richmond had fallen, and Lee's army was marching to make a junction with Johnston. The news was received with great joy by the men of Sherman's army. Bonfires, rockets, and a general jume person on horseback came riding up the road crying to the men as he passed, Grant has captured Lee's army! Soon after, Sherman's Special Field Orders, No. 54, dated Smithfield, North Carolina, Ap general commanding announces to the army that he has official notice from General Grant that General Lee surrendered to him his entire army, on the 9th inst., at Appomattox Court House, Virginia. Gof looking forward to another long, campaign through the South in pursuit of the united armies of Lee and Johnston, the vision of every man now turned homeward. Thoughts of meeting wives, children,
The results were excellent. Three appear with this chapter: a magnificent three-quarter view, enlarged on page 63; a full-length, on page 69; and a group with Custis Lee and Colonel Taylor, on page 67. Another view of this group will be found on page 83 of Volume I; and the fifth of these Brady pictures, a seated profile of Lee Lee alone, on page 23 of Volume III. An early daguerreotypist had portrayed Lee in 1850 as a young engineer-colonel —see page 55. The general's later life is covered by his celebrated photograph on Traveler in September, 1866, on page 121 of Volume IX; by the two portraits of 1867 and 1869 on page 73; by the photograph with Johnston, Lee in 1850 as a young engineer-colonel —see page 55. The general's later life is covered by his celebrated photograph on Traveler in September, 1866, on page 121 of Volume IX; by the two portraits of 1867 and 1869 on page 73; by the photograph with Johnston, taken in 1869, on page 341 of Volume I, and by the striking group photograph that forms the frontispiece to this volume. Robert E. Lee Lee at the height of his fame 1863 had just performed brilliant feats in the Valley of Virginia were not brought up in time. The next day's struggle resulted in a Pyrrhic victory for Lee,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
un Mountain, Second Manassas, Harper's Ferry, Sharpsburg, Shepherdstown, and Gettysburg. These reports are a part of the collection made by General Robert E. Lee when he was preparing to write the history of his campaigns, and all of which General Custis Lee has kindly promised to donate the Society. From General Samuel Jones, Amelia County, Virginia--His own and General W. B. Taliaferro's reports of military operations in the vicinity of Charleston, South Carolina, from the 1st to the 10th h consideration. But we have the following offer to make, which will be of real value both to us and those who may accept it: To any one sending us a club of three new subscribers, with the money ($9), we will send the beautiful lithograph of General Lee on Traveller, which is sold for the benefit of the Lee monument fund. A little effort on the part of our friends will thus largely increase our subscription list, and at the same time secure this really valuable historic picture. In the
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 23: the fall of 1864 (search)
, but the employees of the departments under Custis Lee, the marines and sailors of our little fleet8000 men, with six generals— Ewell, Kershaw, Custis Lee, Dubose, Hunton, and Corse—all captured. d a small supply of rations. Here we found Gen. Lee. While we were getting breakfast, he sent fo occurring between his father, Gen. Wise, and Gen. Lee at Farmville at this time, which I quote:— beard with a coarse towel as we approached. Gen. Lee, exclaimed my father, my poor brave men are lerything like defiance by his kindness. . . . Gen. Lee inquired what he thought of the situation. Sof any man killed hereafter is on your head. Gen. Lee stood for some time at an open window lookinghe fields, and made no response. Well might Lee say, My burdens are heavy enough! Gen. Wise haan hour, it brought also a letter from Grant to Lee, as follows: — April 7, 1865. Generalf Northern Virginia. U. S. Grant, Lt.-Gen. Lee, at that moment, happened to be near Mahone's l[9 more.
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 6 (search)
ls, among them Lieutenant General Ewell, and Custis Lee, Charley Turnbull's friend. I hear these of We are now at Farmville, on the Appomattox, Lee having started for Danville; but we cut him offram will have announced to you the surrender of Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia. This I cons war. I have been to-day in the rebel camp; saw Lee, Longstreet, and many others, among them Mr. Wir homes, where they all say they mean to stay. Lee's army was reduced to a force of less than ten s that Johnston, on learning the destruction of Lee's army, will either surrender or disband his. Icals are down on Grant for the terms he granted Lee. This I expected, but I trust they are in a mises me to-day, he considering the destruction of Lee's army as justifying his return home. Lyman isMarkoe Bache, who had been to see his friend Custis Lee, was told by him that his father, General Leluence his example would have over others. General Lee said he had personally no objections, that [2 more...]
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 9 (search)
mplete this work, so gloriously prosecuted thus far, by the literal or substantial destruction of Lee's Army the rebellion will be over. Yours truly A. Lincoln. Halleck to Meade: July 7, 8.4seen your despatches to Gen. Couch of 4.30 P. M. You are perfectly right. Push forward and fight Lee before he can cross the Potomac. July 8, 12.30 P. M. Halleck to Meade: There is reliable ihave been crossing for the last two days. It is also reported that they have a bridge across. If Lee's Army is divided by the river the importance of attacking the part on this side is incalculable—r rather they retired on being pressed, towards Hagerstown. I am still under the impression that Lee's whole force is between Hagerstown and Williamsport, with an advance at Middleburg, on the road nformation for what it is worth. July 9, 1863, 3 P. M. Halleck to Meade: The evidence that Lee's army will fight north of the Potomac seems reliable. In that case you will want all your force
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