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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 30 (search)
the ferry at Williamsport for the supply of General Lee's army; and from the character of the battl? Answer: My opinion about that was that General Lee was, as far as I could tell, about 10,000 otion which I possessed, that the army under General Lee, which was known to be in the valley and exer's gap, which we held, of the movement of General Lee's army up the valley in further retreat froongstreet's corps, or a portion of it, from General Lee's army, had been detached to the southwest. upon a forward movement against the enemy, General Lee advanced against me. The first intimation wrailroad. I believed, from the position of General Lee's army, and from the fact that he would pree; that if I chose to make any movement against Lee I was at liberty to do so; but that he did not de a further movement to endeavor to engage General Lee in battle, or at least compel him to retiref the Rapidan. This movement was made upon General Lee's right flank. I had ascertained that whil[17 more...]
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 31 (search)
nything of the kind. As the right of the enemy overlapped the left of our line for a considerable distance, it is said that Longstreet was in favor of turning that flank. This would not only force the Union army from the ridge, but would enable Lee to intervene between Meade and Washington. Meade feared that this would be done. He was, doubtless, apprehensive that Lee would steal a march on him in the night and thus endanger the safety of the capital. I do not suppose that Mr. Swinton in Lee would steal a march on him in the night and thus endanger the safety of the capital. I do not suppose that Mr. Swinton in his zeal to defend Gen. Meade will assume that Pleasonton's movement is a myth. The statement is sworn to before the Committee on the Conduct of the War, but as it is in a different volume from the mass of the testimony it has probably escaped Mr. Swinton's notice. The following letter from Gen. Pleasonton reiterates the statement: Willard's hotel, Washington City, Feb. 8, 1883. General: Your note of the 6th inst. is received. In answer to your question I have to state that Gen. Meade
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), Appendix Y (search)
cil, must have referred to the contingency of a successful flank movement by General Lee. Whatever the language, and by whomsoever used, it was not indicative of a n regarding the events of the day, and discussion of the probabilities as to General Lee's future movements, and of the most advisable action to take, General Meade ut adducing any direct evidence, that the possibility of a flank movement by General Lee, threatening the lines of communication of the army, and if successful in cank of the Army of the Potomac was proposed and strongly advocated by him to General Lee. General Meade's first quoted despatch to General Halleck explicitly states ition was not a good one. Some one said, Why so? The officer answered, Because Lee could so easily turn the position if he chose. I did not hear your father utteo record that, from the beginning to the end of the Rebellion, it was only when Meade was chief that Lee was ever met in pitched battle and defeated on equal terms.
tle of, May 9, 1846, I, 78-81, 84. La Vega, Gen., I, 89. Law, E. M., II, 60, 70, 81, 83, 100. Law, Judge, II, 165. Ledlie, James H., II, 346, 348. Lee, Mrs., II, 135, 136. Lee, Bishop, II, 258. Lee, Custis, II, 270, 278. Lee, Fitzhugh, II, 22, 94, 101. Lee, H. T., II, 324. Lee, Robert E., I, 196, 218, Lee, Bishop, II, 258. Lee, Custis, II, 270, 278. Lee, Fitzhugh, II, 22, 94, 101. Lee, H. T., II, 324. Lee, Robert E., I, 196, 218, 273, 282, 286, 319, 340, 346, 361, 380, 383, 385-387; II, 4, 8, 11, 12, 20-24, 26-29, 37, 42, 45, 56, 59-61, 69, 90, 94, 95, 97, 99, 105, 109, 112, 117, 118, 122, 132-143, 148, 149, 151, 153-156, 159, 168, 190, 201, 203, 211, 213, 217, 221, 222, 227, 230, 231, 241, 249, 250, 255, 264, 265, 268-271, 273, 278, 309-311, 316-322, 325, Lee, Custis, II, 270, 278. Lee, Fitzhugh, II, 22, 94, 101. Lee, H. T., II, 324. Lee, Robert E., I, 196, 218, 273, 282, 286, 319, 340, 346, 361, 380, 383, 385-387; II, 4, 8, 11, 12, 20-24, 26-29, 37, 42, 45, 56, 59-61, 69, 90, 94, 95, 97, 99, 105, 109, 112, 117, 118, 122, 132-143, 148, 149, 151, 153-156, 159, 168, 190, 201, 203, 211, 213, 217, 221, 222, 227, 230, 231, 241, 249, 250, 255, 264, 265, 268-271, 273, 278, 309-311, 316-322, 325, 327-330, 337, 340, 342, 350, 352, 353, 355, 363-373, 379, 383, 397, 409, 411, 418, 422. Lee, S. D., II, 262. Lee, Tom, I, 233. Lee, W. H. F., II, 22. Leiper, Charles L., I, 384. Lennig, Thompson, I, 384. Leonard, Samuel H., II, 53. Lewis, I. W. P., I, 205. Light-house construction, I, 200-207. Lincoln, Ab
l Beauregard could get with safety, as he had no escort with which to repel any hostile force he might meet on his way. He had stopped at Macon for a day to confer with General Cobb, whom he found, as ever, zealous and energetic, and who heard with joy how oil had been poured on the troubled waters surrounding Governor Brown. From Macon, fearing that Colonel Harris, whose illness had been reported to him, might not recover, General Beauregard telegraphed General Hardee, recommending General Custis Lee, Colonel William Butler, or Colonel Alfred Rhett, as Commander of the First Subdistrict of South Carolina, in case of Colonel Harris's death. But, in the end, neither General Hardee nor General Jones removed the commander of that subdistrict. General Hardee was one of the finest corps commanders in the Confederate service; but, determined and intrepid as he was on the battlefield, he, like General Sam. Jones, was given to hesitation and procrastination when dealing with matters of im
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
September 22, 1833, of patriotic lineage. His great-grandfather, William Lee, was one of forty leading citizens of Charleston whose devotion to the Continental cause was punished by imprisonment on a prison ship and transportation to St Augustine, Fla. His grandfather, Thomas Lee, was appointed United States district judge by President Monroe. General Lee was appointed to the West Point military academy in 1850, and was graduated in 1854, in the class with J. E. B. Stuart, O. O. Howard, Custis Lee, Pender and Pegram. He served with the Fourth U. S. artillery and held the rank of first-lieutenant and regimental quartermaster when he resigned in 1861. He was appointed a captain in the South Carolina organization, and then commissioned captain in the regular army of the Confederate States and assigned to duty as aide-de-camp to General Beauregard. With Colonel Chestnut, a brother aide, he bore the summons to Major Anderson for the surrender of Fort Sumter, and gave the subsequent no
ected with Mahone's division, forming the rear of Longstreet. The enemy's cavalry penetrated the line of march through the interval thus left and attacked the wagon train moving toward Farmville. This caused serious delay in the march of the center and rear of the column, and enabled the enemy to mass upon their flank. After successive attacks, Anderson's and Ewell's corps were captured or driven from their position. The latter general, with both of his division commanders, Kershaw and Custis Lee, and his brigadiers, were taken prisoners. Gordon, who all the morning, aided by Gen. W. H. F. Lee's cavalry, had checked the advance of the enemy on the road from Amelia Springs and protected the trains, became exposed to his combined assaults, which he bravely resisted and twice repulsed; but the cavalry having been withdrawn to another part of the line of march, and the enemy massing heavily on his front and both flanks, renewed the attack about 6p. m., and drove him from the field in
rs of the brigade, who expressed entire confidence in his skill and bravery. General Ransom himself admitted that the personal gallantry of General Barton could not be questioned. Though feeling that injustice had been done him, he remained in the service, and accepted command of a brigade for the defense of Richmond, comprising artillery and reserve infantry, under Lieutenant-General Ewell. He served at Chaffin's farm until the evacuation of Richmond, and then joined in the retreat of Custis Lee's command, as far as Sailor's creek, where he was captured April 6, 1865. Since the war General Barton has made his home at Fredericksburg, Va. Brigadier-General Richard L. T. Beale Brigadier-General Richard L. T. Beale was born at Hickory Hill, Westmoreland county, Va., May 22, 1819, and was educated at Northumberland academy and Dickinson college, Pa. Then taking up the study of law, he was graduated by the law department of the university of Virginia in 1838. Subsequently he was
rank speedily during his service, but his ability, as well as his modesty, was recognized by General Lee as well as by the people, and it was generally understood that a major-general's commission wf the warm admiration of his men. The brigade now was assigned to Hoke's division, and reinforced Lee at Turkey ridge, where they gallantly repulsed the enemy's assaults on June 3d, and for about ten days afterward were engaged in a sharpshooting fight along the line. Lee, believing Grant would make another attack, informed Martin that he held the key to the Confederate position, and asked if his field of service at the close of the war. After he had left the army of Northern Virginia, General Lee one day highly complimented his old brigade for faithful obedience to orders, and when remindof Tidewater, Va. He was graduated at the United States military academy in 1854, the class of Custis Lee, Stephen D. Lee and J. E. B. Stuart. His first commissions were in the artillery, but in 1855
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
his capacity, being in charge of a considerable portion of the line, until the evacuation of Richmond, and while in this service, in the fall of 1864, he was sent to Fort Harrison, to take command of troops at Chaffin's farm, in the place of Maj. Dick Taylor, who had been captured. While here he was wounded in the left arm. He had received one wound prior to this in the Kilpatrick raid. When the evacuation of Richmond became a certainty, his battalion was placed in Crutchfield's brigade, Custis Lee's division, for the retreat, and in an effort to reach Gen. Robert E. Lee's army they were overtaken by the enemy at Sailor's creek, where a desperate battle ensued, in which General Crutchfield was killed and his entire brigade captured. Major Hardin was taken as a prisoner to Old Capitol prison, Washington. On the evening of his arrival there President Lincoln was assassinated, and this created such intense feeling that, for safety, he, together with the other Confederate officers, was
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