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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 15 1 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 11 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 4 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 3 1 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Fire, sword, and the halter. (search)
l proclivities, it was spared. Hunter remained two or three days at Staunton, and on the 9th of June moved toward Lexington, on his route to Lynchburg. On the 8th, General Breckenridge arrived at Rockfish Gap with a small force drawn from General Lee's army, and assumed command, and immediately began preparing for the defense of Lynchburg. General John McCausland, with his cavalry brigade, was ordered to keep in front of Hunter, and delay and harass him as much as possible, a task which ho burn the house. She asked him by what authority. He told her by that of General Hunter, and showed her his written order. On reading it, she said: The order, I see, sir, is for you to burn the houses of Colonel Alexander R. Boteler and Mr. Edmund I. Lee. Now this is not Colonel Boteler's house, but is the property of my mother, Mrs. Boteler, and therefore must not be destroyed, as you have no authority to burn her house. It's Colonel Boteler's home, and that's enough for me, was Martinda
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 43: the burning of Chambersburg. (search)
R. Boteler, an ex-member of the Confederate Congress, of Mr. Andrew Hunter, a member of the Virginia Senate, and of Mr. Edmund I. Lee, a distant relative of General Lee,--all in Jefferson County, with their contents, only time enough being given forGeneral Lee,--all in Jefferson County, with their contents, only time enough being given for the ladies to get out of their houses. A number of towns in the South, as well as private country houses, had been burned by the Federal troops. I came to the conclusion it was time to open the eyes of the people of the North to this enormity, by I will take occasion here to say that the public, North or South, has never known how small was the force with which General Lee fought that battle. From personal observation and conversation with other officers engaged, including General Lee himGeneral Lee himself, I am satisfied that the latter was not able to carry 30,000 men into action. The exhaustion of our men, in the battles around Richmond, the subsequent battles near Manassas, and on the march to Maryland, when they were for days without anythi
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 44: retreat to Fisher's Hill. (search)
nd drove it off. We encamped near Newtown; and on the morning of the 12th, moved to Hupp's Hill, between Strasburg and Cedar Creek. Finding that the enemy was advancing in much heavier force than I had yet encountered, I determined to take position at Fisher's Hill, above Strasburg, and await his attack there. Imboden with his brigade was sent to the Luray Valley, to watch that route; and, in the afternoon, we moved to Fisher's Hill. I had received information, a few days before, from General Lee, that General Anderson had moved with Kershaw's division of infantry and Fitz. Lee's division of cavalry to Culpeper Court-House; and I sent a dispatch to Anderson informing him of the state of things, and requesting him to move to Front Royal, so as to guard the Luray Valley. Sheridan's advance appeared on the banks of Cedar Creek, on the 12th, and there was some skirmishing with it. My troops were posted at Fisher's Hill, with the right resting on the North Fork of the Shenandoah, a
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
e Golden Circle, 353 Lacy's Springs, 326, 457 Lamar, Colonel, 153, 180, 388 Lancaster, 261 Lane's Brigade, 171, 173, 199, 274, 355-56 Langhorne, Colonel D. A., 2, 3 Langster's Cross-Roads, 47, 50 Latimer, Captain J. W., 176, 179, 186, 199, 200, 205-06 Lawton, Captain E. P., 175, 180 Lawton, General, 75, 103, 106-08, 111, 112, 115-17, 119-124, 126-27, 129, 136-37, 139, 140-44, 152-53, 155, 158, 162, 171, 174-75, 177, 179, 180, 187-88, 190, 192 Lee, Captain, 216 Lee, Edmund I., 401, 478 Lee, General, Fitz., 153, 192, 303, 318, 320-21, 325-26, 328-30, 332-34, 337, 407-09, 411, 413-14, 416, 421, 423, 424-25, 427, 429, 433, 435, 459 Lee, General R. E., 1. 5-7, 74, 76-77, 85, 88-90, 92, 104, 105, 114, 119, 125, 131-33, 139, 154-57, 160-61, 164, 169, 180, 181-83, 196-97, 200-201, 203, 211, 217-18, 220, 227-28, 282, 284, 288, 290, 297, 301, 303, 305, 307, 309-11, 313-14, 315, 317, 319-20, 322, 324, 326-27, 329, 332, 339-40, 343-44, 347-48, 351- 56, 358, 360-64,
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 16: return to Richmond.-President of Washington College.--death and Burial. (search)
ons in great numbers can be given: A cousin of the general's, Mr. Edmund I. Lee, from Shepherdstown, October 31, 1870, writes Mrs. Lee: I canMrs. Lee: I can not find language to convey the distress I felt when I first read the announcement of Robert's death in the papers. The most pleasant recoll your great sorrow, I venture to write, not merely to say how I, General Lee's earliest and most devoted friend, lament his death and how sad E. Johnston. A dear little girl wrote: I have heard of General Lee, your husband, and of all his great and noble deeds during the w Respectfully, Maggie McIntyre. Rev. R. S. Stewart wrote to Mrs. Lee from Baltimore, December 29, 1872: Accident a few weeks ago led mek with the identity of character between Sir William Wallace and General Lee that I can not help mentioning it to you and asking you to read th its presentation to the State of Virginia than any one else. General Lee was also pre-sented with a magnificently illustrated Bible from
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
on Richmond, 323. King's division, 191, 192, 193. Kossuth, General, Louis, 423. Lacy House, 229. Lacy, Rev. Dr. B. T., 246. Lafayette, Marquis, 10. La Haye, Sainte, 420. Last cavalry engagement, 393. Latane, Captain, killed, 153. Lawton, General, 130. League of Gileadites, 75. Ledlie, General, 357, 358, 359- Lee, Algernon Sydney, 17. Lee, Anne Hill, 20. Lee, Annie, mentioned, 217, 235. Lee, Cassius F., 29, 30. Lee, Charles Carter, 13, 17. Lee, Charles, 7. Lee, Edmund I., 416. Lee, Francis Lightfoot, 6. Lee genealogy, 21. Lee, General, Fitzhugh, mentioned, 172, 183, 187, 188, 194, 206, 219, 318, 371, 375, 376, 385, 387; letter to, 408. Lee, General George Washington Custis, mentioned, 23, 71, 72, 94, 95, 330, 380, 401; captured, 385. Lee, General, Henry, Light-horse Harry, mentioned, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, II, 12, 14, , , 16, 7, 20, 80; his grave, 410. Lee, General Robert E., birth, 20; ancestry and education; 21; at Military Academy, 23; enters a
le we were near Washington, among other outrages, the private residences of Mr. Andrew Hunter, a member of the Virginia Senate, Mr. Alexander R. Boteler, an ex-member of the Confederate Congress, as well as of the United States Congress, and Edmund I. Lee, a distant relative of General Lee, all in Jefferson County, with their contents, had been burned by his orders, only time enough being given for the ladies to get out of the houses. A number of towns in the South, as well as private countryGeneral Lee, all in Jefferson County, with their contents, had been burned by his orders, only time enough being given for the ladies to get out of the houses. A number of towns in the South, as well as private country-houses, had been burned by Federal troops, and the accounts had been heralded forth in some of the Northern papers in terms of exaltation, and gloated over by their readers, while they were received with apathy by others. I now came to the conclusion that we had stood this mode of warfare long enough, and that it was time to open the eyes of the people of the North to its enormity by an example in the way of retaliation. I did not select the cases mentioned as having more merit or greater cl
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
rder, but his acts of brutality that provoked the burning of Chambersburg exceeded even Grant's barbarous order. When Hunter had returned to the lower Valley from the Kanawha he selected the homes of three prominent citizens of Virginia (Messrs. Edmund I. Lee, and Andrew Hunter, and Colonel A. R. Boteler) and sending an officer and party turned out the lady occupants and burned the houses, refusing them permission to save anything from the flames. It is not claimed that these gentlemen had doction. The truth is that Sheridan was sent forward with a movable column of about 50,000 men, to drive Early with a force of somewhere between 13,000 and 15,000 men out of the Valley. The large detachments that Grant had made to Sheridan enabled Lee to order Kershaw's division of infantry, and Fitz. Lee's cavalry, under General Anderson, to Early's assistance. Sheridan began to move from Harper's Ferry promptly, and Early fell back before him to Fisher's Hill, to await the arrival of his rei
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Shenandoah Valley in 1864, by George E. Pond—Campaigns of the civil war, XI. (search)
rder, but his acts of brutality that provoked the burning of Chambersburg exceeded even Grant's barbarous order. When Hunter had returned to the lower Valley from the Kanawha he selected the homes of three prominent citizens of Virginia (Messrs. Edmund I. Lee, and Andrew Hunter, and Colonel A. R. Boteler) and sending an officer and party turned out the lady occupants and burned the houses, refusing them permission to save anything from the flames. It is not claimed that these gentlemen had doction. The truth is that Sheridan was sent forward with a movable column of about 50,000 men, to drive Early with a force of somewhere between 13,000 and 15,000 men out of the Valley. The large detachments that Grant had made to Sheridan enabled Lee to order Kershaw's division of infantry, and Fitz. Lee's cavalry, under General Anderson, to Early's assistance. Sheridan began to move from Harper's Ferry promptly, and Early fell back before him to Fisher's Hill, to await the arrival of his rei