hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 6 results in 3 document sections:

ason, landsman, severely; Thomas Kelly, boatswain's mate; Edward Brown, captain of the guard, severely; John Sherlock, ship's cook, severely; John Jenkins, ordinary seaman, severely ; James O'Haniel, seaman, severely; Samuel Cooper, ordinary seaman, slightly; David Henderson, ordinary seaman, slightly; A. C. Gifford, ordinary seaman, slightly; John Stuart, ordinary seaman, slightly; Samuel Randolph, ordinary seaman, slightly; P. McKay, landsman, slightly; Edward Bowman, landsman, slightly; Edward Lee, first-class boy, slightly; Henry Stambach, sergeant of marines, slightly; George Perkins, marine, slightly; Michael O'Brien, marine, slightly; Frederick Daoz, marine, slightly; Francis Pepper, marine, slightly; John Brogan, marine, slightly; John C. Harris, lieutenant of marines, slightly; Shultz Gerard, Acting Master, slightly; John C. Hadley, Third Assistant Engineer, slightly; Wilson Goodrich, boatswain, slightly; Joseph B. Cox, carpenter, slightly; Alfred Reynolds, Master's Mate, slig
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore), Little Eddie, the Drummer-Boy: a Reminiscence of Wilson's Creek. (search)
nnessee. Our fifer immediately commenced straightening himself upward until all the angles in his person had disappeared, when he placed his fife in his mouth, and played the Flowers of Edenborough, one of the most difficult things to follow with the drum that could have been selected, and nobly did the little fellow follow him, showing himself to be a master of the drum. When the music ceased, our Captain turned to the mother and observed: Madam, I will take your boy. What is his name? Edward Lee, she replied; then placing her hand upon the Captain's arm, she continued, Captain, if he is not killed-- here her maternal feelings overcame her utterances, and she bent down over her boy and kissed him upon the forehead. As she arose, she observed: Captain, you will bring him back with you, won't you? Yes, Yes, he replied, we will be certain to bring him back with us. We shall be discharged in six weeks. In an hour after, our company led the Iowa First out of camp, our drum and fife
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Bibliographical note. (search)
63, 2 vols.; A Rebel War-clerk's Diary, by Jones, Philadelphia, 1866, 2 vols.; Memoirs of the Confederate War, by Heros Von Borcke, London, 1866, 2 vols.; Medical Recollections of the Army of the Potomac, by Chief Surgeon Letterman, New York, 1866, 1 vol.; Four Years of Fighting, by Coffin, Boston, 1866, 1 vol.; Partisan Life with Mosby, by Scott, London, 1867, 1 vol.; General Burnside and the Ninth Army Corps, by Woodbury, Providence, 1867, 1 vol.; Three Years in the Sixth Corps, by Stevens, 2d edition, New York, 1870, 1 vol.; General Lee, by Edward Lee-Childe, Paris, 1874, 1 vol.; Narrative of Military Operations, by General J. E. Johnston, New York, 1874, 1 vol. This last-named work, which has just appeared, possesses an especial interest, being written by the principal survivor of the Confederate generals, nine years after the close of the war, with all the care and moderation to be expected from a writer who relates events in which he has himself played the most conspicuous part.