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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 718 4 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 564 12 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 458 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 458 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 376 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 306 2 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 280 0 Browse Search
John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War. 279 23 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 237 5 Browse Search
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence 216 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Fitz Lee or search for Fitz Lee in all documents.

Your search returned 231 results in 10 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Work of the Ordnance Bureau of the war Department of the Confederate States, 1861-5. (search)
ordnance corps. I was in the summer of 1862 serving most pleasantly as aide-de-camp on the staff of General Rodes, whom I had known well before the war. Another friend of his was Colonel Briscoe Baldwin, chief ordnance officer on the staff of General Lee, and who had been for a while in charge of Richmond arsenal. Colonel Baldwin visited our camp below Richmond at the time of the battle of Seven Pines, talked with me about the state of the ordnance service, and asked me to go with him to the place were captured, it was ordered that as brave a show as possible should be made by keeping up heavy fire all along the line as soon as the enemy should appear. We were on the afternoon of the 20th of April—eleven days after the surrender of Gen. Lee's army and six days after President Lincoln had been assassinated—drawn up on the line of earth work which had been prepared several months before, and were hourly expecting the arrival of Wilson's force, known to be near at hand, when a joint t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stuart's cavalry in the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
eep in touch with our main army and to keep General Lee informed as to the movements of the enemy. and that it was impossible for him to keep General Lee informed of the movements of himself and thtwo brigades of calvary with Longstreet and General Lee. As regards Col. Mosby's belief that GeGeneral Lee signed his reports without reading them, or even having them read to him, Col. W. H. Tayln page 203 of his book, you and I know that General Lee never sent a formal battle report to the Designed without being read, and his doubt if General Lee ever read it, or if it was even read to himn observation, as a member of his staff, of General Lee's preparation of official documents was nottain the suggestion made by Col. Mosby that General Lee signed his official reports of the battle ot of his contention, in defense of Stuart, that Lee had sufficient cavalry to keep him informed of f the 24th, the following brigades—Hampton's, Fitz Lee's and W. H. F. Lee's—rendezvoused secretly ne[12 more...]<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Review of the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
ese we will briefly refer. On June 20th, General Lee's headquarters were at Berryville, on the rrotecting his flanks. It will depend (said General Lee), upon the quantity of supplies obtained inact from a letter, dated 23d June, in which General Lee says: * * * If General Hooker's army remg joined by the garrison there, and moving upon Lee's rear upon the Potomac. My object was to destl report of July 31st, already referred to, General Lee states that preparations were made to advackett's at Chambersburg, twenty-four miles. General Lee, writing from Greenwood on July 1st to Imbond he was handicapped by the knowledge that General Lee did not wish a general engagement brought ond Longstreet, and on the way, so great was General Lee's impatience at the inaction, that for a liuld have materially affected the result. General Lee assigns as a reason for giving battle the de President of the Confederacy on July 8th, General Lee says of the Army: Though reduced in numbers[115 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Story of battle of five Forks. (search)
hing, on the 31st of March, moved against General Fitz Lee, who had assembled the Confederate cavalre closed for the night, Warren's corps was on Fitz Lee's flank, and almost in his rear. Pickett anded and disorganized, and left the right wing of Lee's army with almost no infantry and without any ersburg. After the rout of the right wing of Lee's army, it appeared possible to destroy or capthe campaign of ‘64, commanded the right wing of Lee's army and was so successful in defeating all oad on the line of the railroad to Danville, and Lee had to turn off in the direction of Lynchburg, Lee at Appomattox—surrender. On the 8th, General Lee, with the remainder of the army, resumed hithis artillery—about one-half the artillery of Lee's army, without any infantry or cavalry with itch and disbanded his command. On the 9th General Lee ordered Gordon and Fitz Lee to drive SheridFitz Lee to drive Sheridan away, that the army might resume its march, which they did very promptly, but found that Ord was [7 more...
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General J. E. B. Stuart in the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
29th, and it is then in complete harmony with Gen. Lee's report, with the statements of his staff onlong after 10 P. M., June 28th, when he found Gen. Lee in conference with the scout who brought the efore he sent his staff officer to transmit General Lee's order to General Early at York. Then finsby says: Nobody can reconcile this letter with Lee's report. Neither can anybody reconcile this ln on the 29th, it is in complete harmony with Gen. Lee's report. But even if it were granted that Linst Harrisburg; yet Colonel Mosby asserts that Lee had no such plan, though it is stated in both hcies in the Reports of the battle signed by General Lee, but it is asking too much of our credulityther by Chambersburg. [Observe that when General Lee gave General Stuart this order to take posiformation. General Fitz Lee in his life of General Lee, with these reports before him, states thatat writer has passed on Col. Marshall's work in Lee's report: It is a fine example of special plead[26 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), An incident of the battle of Winchester, or Opequon. (search)
of cavalry, with the exception of Wilson's division (which had been thrown to our right and held in check by Lomax), advanced, overlapping the small commands of Fitz Lee and Breckenridge a mile in distance and seeming to cover the whole face of the earth with their massive numbers. Just at that juncture Rodes fell, while directiill largely exceed Early's. From my observation of that command and from my knowledge of the numbers which Early encountered, my opinion has long been fixed that Lee had no lieutenant whose talents for war were more brilliant than those of Early. The records prove his achievements so clearly that they cannot either be rubbed ouly in 1861, was given the same position in the Confederate service. This statement, therefore, may be regarded as official. General Trimble further said: General Lee often told me that he had much at heart the separate organization of the Marylanders. They are, he said, unrivaled soldiers, and, if brought together, we may g
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle at Bethesda Church. (search)
lso was killed; 'twas there the brave Colonel J. B. Terrill, of the Thirteenth Virginia, ended his useful career, as did, also, Major Watkins, the brave soldier of the Fifty-second. 'Twas there Colonel J. C. Gibson, like an old war-horse, always scenting the battle in the breeze, came down from the hospital on one leg and got the other shattered to pieces. In fact, every field officer, and nearly every company officer, in the brigade, present in action, was either killed, or wounded. General Lee's lines were formed at right angle to the—— road leading down James River near second Cold Harbor. Then enemy on our front shifted their position and threw up earthworks lower down the road, and parallel to it. Orders came to Early's old brigade (the Fourth Virginia), composed of the Forty-ninth, Fifty-second, Fifty-eighth, Thirty-first, and Thirteenth Regiments, to march down the road and make a reconnoissance preliminary to second Cold Harbor battle. Our regiment, the Forty-ninth Virg
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Appendix. (search)
to America have come to light, and as both parties have departed, it seems due to history that they should be given to the world. The letter written by Mr. Greeley concerning Mr. Breckinridge's return is addressed to Judge George Shea, of New York. This, and the letter inclosing it, written by Judge Shea to Mr. Breckinridge, are as follows: Office of the New York Tribune, New York, April 8, 1867. My friend,—Since nearly all the military chiefs of the South in our late struggle-Generals Lee, Johnston, Beauregard, Longstreet, &c.—have stoutly advised their people to accept their situation unreservedly, and organize their respective States, in accordance with the dictates of Congress, it seems to me a pity that the presence and counsel of General Breckinridge are wanting. We need them not in the South proper, but in his own Kentucky, where a most unfortunate attempt to perpetuate class distinctions, which have no longer any national justification or solid basis, threaten to p
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Heth intended to cover his error. (search)
the battle of Gettysburg without order from General Lee. Heth's letter was published in the Southeboth his own and Hill's official reports to General Lee. The latter says they went on July 1st afteth, early in the morning went into action, General Lee was ten miles away west of the mountain, Heth tries to make it appear that Lee was on the field. Other reports on the movement. Pendletmp. This statement assumes that Gettysburg was Lee's objective point; it was not. Lee was as williLee was as willing for Meade to be at Gettysburg as anywhere else; he had no idea of going there himself before he ashtown. There was more reason for censuring Lee for being absent from the field than Stuart. It is impossible to believe that General Lee ever professed the ignorance of the movements of Stuaer 27, 1877, Heth professes to have read in General Lee's letter-book his instructions to Stuart toes, return to Cashtown, and present them to General Lee that evening. But to use a common expressi[10 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
Mrs. John A., 366. Lomax, Gen. L. L., 177. Longstreet, Gen. Old Pete, 78, 126. Lumpkin, Rev. J. T., 266, 282. Lee's, Gen. last camp, 208. Lee, Gen. Fitz., 35. Lee, Gen R. E. 21, 31. Lee Gen. W. H. F., 35, 69. Lincoln dejecteLee, Gen. Fitz., 35. Lee, Gen R. E. 21, 31. Lee Gen. W. H. F., 35, 69. Lincoln dejected at Lee's escape, 75; course of, inconsistent, 362. McAlwee, G. W. 354. McAnerny, Capt. John, 200. McBirney, Major, 19. McCabe, Capt. W. Gordon, 61. McLaws, Gen. L., 108. Mallet Lt. Col. J. W., 1. Malvern Hill, Battle of, 357. Lee, Gen R. E. 21, 31. Lee Gen. W. H. F., 35, 69. Lincoln dejected at Lee's escape, 75; course of, inconsistent, 362. McAlwee, G. W. 354. McAnerny, Capt. John, 200. McBirney, Major, 19. McCabe, Capt. W. Gordon, 61. McLaws, Gen. L., 108. Mallet Lt. Col. J. W., 1. Malvern Hill, Battle of, 357. Manassas 8th Virginia at Second, 313. Marshall, Col. Charles 34, 323. Marylanders in the C. S. Army, 235. Massey, Col. E. C., 164. Maury, Gen. D. H., 324. Meade, General, 104. Memorial Day, Origin of. 368. Memorial Sermon in Lee's escape, 75; course of, inconsistent, 362. McAlwee, G. W. 354. McAnerny, Capt. John, 200. McBirney, Major, 19. McCabe, Capt. W. Gordon, 61. McLaws, Gen. L., 108. Mallet Lt. Col. J. W., 1. Malvern Hill, Battle of, 357. Manassas 8th Virginia at Second, 313. Marshall, Col. Charles 34, 323. Marylanders in the C. S. Army, 235. Massey, Col. E. C., 164. Maury, Gen. D. H., 324. Meade, General, 104. Memorial Day, Origin of. 368. Memorial Sermon in Old St. John's Church, 338. Minor, Lieut. R. D., 50. Morrison. Col. E. M., 319. Mosby Col. John S., 21, 34, 210; Unjust strictures by, 230, 269. Munford's Marylauders never surrendered 309. Murdaugh, John D. 39. Murdaugh, Capt. Wm.