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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 7, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
gue of Gileadites, 75. Ledlie, General, 357, 358, 359- Lee, Algernon Sydney, 17. Lee, Anne Hill, 20. Lee, Annie, mentioned, 217, 235. Lee, Cassius F., 29, 30. Lee, Charles Carter, 13, 17. Lee, Charles, 7. Lee, Edmund I., 416. Lee, Francis Lightfoot, 6. Lee genealogy, 21. Lee, General, Fitzhugh, mentioned, 172, 183, 187, 188, 194, 206, 219, 318, 371, 375, 376, 385, 387; letter to, 408. Lee, General George Washington Custis, mentioned, 23, 71, 72, 94, 95, 330, 380, 401; captureLee genealogy, 21. Lee, General, Fitzhugh, mentioned, 172, 183, 187, 188, 194, 206, 219, 318, 371, 375, 376, 385, 387; letter to, 408. Lee, General George Washington Custis, mentioned, 23, 71, 72, 94, 95, 330, 380, 401; captured, 385. Lee, General, Henry, Light-horse Harry, mentioned, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, II, 12, 14, , , 16, 7, 20, 80; his grave, 410. Lee, General Robert E., birth, 20; ancestry and education; 21; at Military Academy, 23; enters army, 24; marriage, 25 ; at Hampton Roads, 27; happy life, 28; letters, 29, 30; stationed at Fort Hamilton, 30; promotion, 31; joins Scott's staff, 33; Lee's horses, 34; at Vera Cruz, 36; battle of Cerro Gordo, 38; his gallantry, 42; brevetted, 42; letters, 44, 45; Lee's comr
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Declaration of Independence. (search)
Treat Paine, Elbridge Gerry. Rhode Island, Etc. Stephen Hopkins, William Ellery. Connecticut. Roger Sherman, Samuel Huntington, William Williams, Oliver Wolcott. New York. William Floyd, Philip Livingston, Francis Lewis, Lewis Morris. New Jersey. Richard Stockton, John Witherspoon, Francis Hopkinson, John Hart, Abraham Clark. North Carolina. William Hooper, Joseph Hewes, John Penn. Georgia. Button Gwinnett, Lyman Hall, George Walton. Pennsylvania. Robert Morris, Benjamin Rush, Benjamiin Franklin, John Morton, George Clymer, James Smith, George Taylor, William Paca, George Ross. Delaware. Caesar Rodney, George Read, Thomas McKean. Maryland. Samuel Chase, James Wilson, Thomas Stone, Charles Carroll of Carrollton. Virginia. George Wythe, Richard Henry Lee, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Harrison Thomas Nelson, Jr., Francis Lightfoot Lee, Carter Braxton. South Carolina. Edward Rutledge, Thomas Heyward, Jr., Thomas Lynch, Jr., Arthur Middleton.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lee, Francis Lightfoot 1734-1797 (search)
Lee, Francis Lightfoot 1734-1797 Signer of the Declaration of Independence; born in Stratford, Westmoreland co., Va., Oct. 14, 1734; brother of Richard Henry and Arthur Lee. In 1765 he was a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses, and held that post until 1772. He was in the Continental Congress from 1775 to 1779, and was active and efficient in framing the Articles of Confederation. He was afterwards a State Senator. He died in Richmond, Va., April 3, 1797.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address of General Dabney H. Maury at the Reunion of Confederate veterans, Maury camp, no. 2, Fredericksburg, Va., August 23, 1883. (search)
oment while I call over the names of a few slave-owners in my parish in Virginia, who were born and bred in slavery, and who for elevation of character, education and surpassing intellect cannot be matched by the whole State of Massachusetts. The plantation adjoining mine on the north is Wakefield, where George Washington was born. Next to me on the south is Stratford, where Richard Henry Lee and Light Horse Harry Lee were born. Next to Stratford comes Chantilly, where Arthur Lee, Francis Lightfoot Lee, Charles Lee and William Lee were born. If the gentleman will ride with me six miles I'll take him to Monroe's Creek, where President Monroe was born; if he will ride with me half an hour longer I will take him to Port Conway, where President Madison was born; if he will then stand with me in my portico I will show him, over the tree-tops, the chimney-stacks of the baronial mansion where Robert E. Lee first saw the light. Can Massachusetts match those men? There is no wonder, th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Degrading influence of slavery—Reply of Judge Critcher to Mr. Hoar. (search)
from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. He would proceed to name them, and yield the floor to the gentleman to match them if he could. On one side of his estate is Wakefield, the birth-place of Washington. On the other side is Stratford, the residence of Light Horse Harry Lee, of glorious Revolutionary memory. Adjoining Stratford is Chantilly, the residence of Richard Henry Lee, the mover of the Declaration of Independence, and the Cicero of the American Revolution. There lived Francis Lightfoot Lee, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. Charles Lee, at one time Washington's Attorney-General; and Arthur Lee, the accomplished negotiator of the treaty of commerce and alliance between the Colonies and France in 1777. Returning, as said before, you come first to the birth-place of Washington; another hour's drive will bring you to the birth-place of Monroe; another hour's drive to the birth-place of Madison, and if the gentleman supposes that the present generatio
Francis Lightfoot, William and Arthur — and two daughters. Philip Ludwell Lee married a Miss. Stepton. He succeeded his father on the estate of Stratford, in Westmoreland. He left two daughters. Matilda, the eldest, married General Henry Lee, of the Revolution; and Flora married Mr. Ludwell Lee, of Loudoun. Thomas Ludwell Lee settled in Stafford, and married a Miss. Aylett. Richard Henry Lee was educated in England. He married, first, a Miss Aylett, and then a Miss Pinkard. Francis Lightfoot Lee was almost as distinguished in the Revolutionary period as an orator and a statesman as his brother. He married the daughter of Colonel John Tayloe, of Richmond county. The fifth son, William, was sheriff and alderman of the city of London. Arthur, the sixth and youngest son, as a scholar, writer, philosopher and diplomatist, was one of the first men of his day. Henry Lee, the fifth son of Richard Lee, married a Bland. This is the ancestor of our General Lee. His son Richar