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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 38: battle of the Wilderness. (search)
nother report started by Fitzhugh Lee as coming from his cousin, G. W. C. Lee, was that General Lee said that he sent an officer to LongstreetGeneral Lee said that he sent an officer to Longstreet to stay with and show him the roads. This, like all other reported sayings of General Lee in regard to me, was not published until after General Lee in regard to me, was not published until after General Lee's death. When it was first published I wrote General G. W. C. Lee for the name of the officer sent. He referred me to the membeGeneral Lee's death. When it was first published I wrote General G. W. C. Lee for the name of the officer sent. He referred me to the members of General Lee's staff. Not one of them knew of the circumstance or the officer, but referred me to General Lee's engineers. After long General G. W. C. Lee for the name of the officer sent. He referred me to the members of General Lee's staff. Not one of them knew of the circumstance or the officer, but referred me to General Lee's engineers. After long search I found the engineers and applied for information, but not one of them knew anything of the alleged fact. I had the letters published General Lee's staff. Not one of them knew of the circumstance or the officer, but referred me to General Lee's engineers. After long search I found the engineers and applied for information, but not one of them knew anything of the alleged fact. I had the letters published as an advertisement for the officer who was claimed as my guide. No response came. I inquired of the members of the staff, First Corps; notGeneral Lee's engineers. After long search I found the engineers and applied for information, but not one of them knew anything of the alleged fact. I had the letters published as an advertisement for the officer who was claimed as my guide. No response came. I inquired of the members of the staff, First Corps; not one had seen or heard of such a person. The quartermaster, Colonel Taylor, who was ordered to secure a competent guide at the first moment
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 41: battle of five Forks. (search)
the south side with fourteen thousand men of the Army of the James, leaving General Weitzel with twenty thousand on the north side. Estimated from returns. In front of that force we had ten thousand men of Field's and Kershaw's divisions and G. W. C. Lee's division of local defence troops (not including Gary's cavalry, the sailors and marines) holding the forts at Drury's and Chapin's farms. General Grant's orders were that his troops at all points should be ready to receive orders for assault. Duly informed of the enemy's movements, and understanding his purpose, General Lee marched to his right on the 29th. Fitzhugh Lee's cavalry was called in advance to march for Five Forks. General Lee marched with fifteen thousand infantry, three thousand cavalry (including Fitzhugh Lee's division), and a quota of artillery, along the White Oak road to his right. The purpose of the enemy was to overreach the fortified grounds and call the Confederates to field work, and General Lee tho
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 42: Petersburg. (search)
Corps, which wrecked the bridge behind it. G. W. C. Lee's division, including the garrison at Chapied through Chesterfield Court-House to join G. W. C. Lee's division in its after-march. General Keroyed his divisions, Kershaw's on the right, G. W. C. Lee's on the left. Their plan was, that Anderse night before, up rode Colonel Venable, of General Lee's staff, and wanted to know if he, General 's Creek, where the disaster had occurred. General Lee rode with me, Colonel Venable a little in tng herd just referred to had crowded around General Lee while he sat on his horse with a Confederatg of the affair at Sailor's Creek, nor from General Lee, until next morning. Our work at Rice's Str a little quiet to prepare breakfast, when General Lee rode up and said that the bridges had been ered under arms and put in quick march, but General Lee urged double-quick. Our cavalry was then en all. the last of our trouble for the day. General Lee stopped at a cottage near my line, where I [8 more...]
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 43: Appomattox. (search)
Chapter 43: Appomattox. Some of General Lee's officers say to him that further resistance is hopeless Longstreet does not approve General Grant calls ponse to his officers as represented by General Pendleton correspondence of Generals Lee and Grant morning of April 9 General Lee rides to meet the Federal commandGeneral Lee rides to meet the Federal commander, while Longstreet forms the last line of battle Longstreet endeavors to recall his chief, hearing of a break where the Confederate troops could pass Custer demaas confided to General Pendleton, who, both by his character and devotion to General Lee, was well qualified for such an office. The names of Longstreet and some otr associates, did not appear in the list presented by Pendleton. Memoirs of General Lee, A. L. Long. A little after nightfall a flag of truce appeared under torchlight in front of Mahone's line bearing a note to General Lee: Headquarters Armies of the United States, 5 P. M., April 7, 1865. General R. E. Lee, Commanding Confed