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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 108 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for H. B. Lee or search for H. B. Lee in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General S. D. Lee's report of the siege of Vicksburg. (search)
as active and energetic in the discharge of his duties, and was unceasing in his efforts during night and day to check the approach of the enemy. Of my personal staff I would mention the uniform, cool, and gallant conduct of Capt. Wm. Elliott, Assistant Adjutant-General, who was always at the post of danger inspiring confidence by his example. Capt. W. H. Johnson and Lt. H. N. Martin, acting aides-de-camp, and Capt. Curell and Lt. Underhill. volunteer aides de-camp, behaved with gallantry during the siege. I would also mention Mr. West, who was serving on my staff; my orderly, L. B. Murphey, Forty-sixth Alabama regiment, and my couriers, Hill and J. M. Simpson, who were always gallant and at their posts. The report of casualities in the different regiments and companies cannot yet be furnished, as the reports have not been received from their respective commanders. Yours respectfully, S. D. Lee, Brigadier-General. Official: H. B. Lee, First Lieutenant and A. D. C.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Defence of batteries Gregg and Whitworth, and the Evacuation of Petersburg. (search)
Swinton. The former, page 445 of his Life of Gen. Lee says: The forts, especially Gregg, made a galur lines, then resting below Burgess' mill. General Lee shifted to his extreme right Pickett's diviof horse equipments, saddle, bridle, &c., for Gen. Lee and each member of his staff, presents from Minter quarters near Petersburg, called to see Gen. Lee, dined with him, and secured one of his photo and my guest at the time, was present with General Lee. Colonel Ashford was wounded, and on ho Gen. Lee. Col. Venable, aide-de-camp to Gen. Lee, soon joined me with a message that Harris' bPetersburg breastworks; among this number was Gen. Lee himself; and while all the praise that has bel God and in the judgment of our great and good Lee will, I feel confident, in the end insure succe In the afternoon, about 3 o'clock P. M., General Lee, in the presence of General Longstreet, Gennt to be made successfully. By order of General Lee: W. H. Taylor, Assistant Adjutant Gene[2 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gen. Lee's strength and losses at Gettysburg. (search)
Gen. Lee's strength and losses at Gettysburg. By Col. William Allan. [The following is in reply, and at Aldie, &c., (June 17thto 21st,) before Lee crossed the Potomac, putting the aggregate cava0,000 men. On June 10th it numbered in the Lee's Strength and Losses at Gettysburg. 39 return imates made of it at the time of the battle, by Lee, or Longstreet, or Ewell, or by citizens, we wo, reported as coming from Gen. Longstreet, that Lee had at Gettysburg 67,000 bayonets, or above 70,ve 51,000 for the entire infantry strength of Gen. Lee, or under 61,000 for every thing. Note in connection with this: 1. Gen. Lee's own statement to Gen. Early, myself and others, in which he pysburg, Southern Review, April, 1868.) 2. Gen. Lee's papers were burned at the close of the war,the Confederate return, published by Swinton, Gen. Lee could hardly have taken over 60,000 with him. Bates himself. All these go to show that Gen. Lee moved northward with about 60,000 men, and th[2 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Causes of the defeat of Gen. Lee's Army at the battle of Gettysburg-opinions of leading Confederate soldiers. (search)
Causes of the defeat of Gen. Lee's Army at the battle of Gettysburg-opinions of leading Confederatbeen and still am firmly convinced that, if General Lee's plans and orders had been promptly and stt was a brilliant success for our arms. General Lee reached the part of the field where Hill wass a crushing defeat of Meade's army. It was Gen. Lee's purpose to begin the battle at a very earlyxt day, we could still win the victory, and General Lee determined to make the attempt. There was rful magnanimity of character which induced General Lee often to take the chances of incurring censth, 1876. General J. A. Early: Dear Sir: General Lee and staff arrived on the field at Gettysburarly the next morning. As an evidence that General Lee anticipated an early commencement of the bal. When returning to the right, I found General Lee atEwell's headquarters, on the outskirts ofere in motion. Finding a convenient point, General Lee waited a reasonable time for Longstreet to [19 more...]