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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 12 0 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Fire, sword, and the halter. (search)
hy have you burned my house? Answer as you must answer before the Searcher of all hearts; why have you added this cruel, wicked deed to your many crimes? Henrietta E. Lee. I have only recited the more prominent incidents of Hunter's brief career in the Valley of Virginia. The United States Government could not stand it, his it, as many of his prominent officers yet living tell how keenly they felt the stigma such acts-beyond their control-brought on them. Shortly after the date of Mrs. Lee's letter he was removed, to the honor of the service, and General Sheridan was his successor — of his career, perhaps, anon! If the people of Chambersburg will goaded to madness, remuneration was demanded at their hands by General Early, and upon its refusal retaliation was inflicted on the nearest community that could be reached, and it was their misfortune to be that community. Contrast Lee in Pennsylvania, in 1863, and Hunter in Virginia, in 1864, and judge them both as history will
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Morale of General Lee's army. (search)
The Morale of General Lee's army. Rev. J. William Jones, D. D. In his testimony before the Committee on the conduct of the War, Major General Joseph Hooker says: Our artillery had always been superior to that of the rebels, as was also our infantry, except in discipline; and that, for reasons not necessary to mention, never did equal Lee's army. With a rank and file vastly inferior to our own, intellectually and physically, that army had, by discipline alone, acquired a character for steadiness and efficiency unsurpassed, in my judgment, in ancient or modern times. We have not been able to rival it, nor has there been any near approximation to it in which those masters of the art of war, J. E. Johnston and Beauregard, moulded into what was afterward the famous Army of Northern Virginia, with which our peerless Lee won his series of splendid victories. It was common for the Northern press to represent that secession leaders betrayed the people of the South, and led them un
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Mrs. Henrietta E. Lee's letter to General David Hunter on the burning of her house. (search)
Mrs. Henrietta E. Lee's letter to General David Hunter on the burning of her house. The following burning protest against a cruel wrong deserves to be put on record, as a part of the history of General David Hunter's inglorious campaign in the Valley of Virginia, and we cheerfully comply with the request of a distinguished friend to publish it. The burning of this house and those of Colonel A. R. Boteler and Andrew Hunter, Esq., in the lower Valley, and of Governor Letcher's and the Virgile for human lips to raise your name heavenward, angels would thrust the foul thing back again, and demons claim their own. The curses of thousands, the scorn of the manly and upright and the hatred of the true and honorable, will follow you and yours through all time, and brand your name infamy! Infamy! Again, I demand why you have burned my home? Answer as you must answer before the Searcher of all hearts, why have you added this cruel, wicked deed to your many crimes? Henrietta E. Lee.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Relative strength at Second Manassas. (search)
of all arms at the beginning of the second Manassas campaign about 22,500. What forces did General Lee add to this from Richmond? Colonel Walter Taylor (Four Years with General Lee, page 60) saysGeneral Lee, page 60) says: General Lee . . . took with him the divisions of Longstreet, D. R. Jones, Hood and Anderson, leaving in front of Richmond the divisions of D. H. Hill and McLaws, and two brigades under J. G. WalkerGeneral Lee . . . took with him the divisions of Longstreet, D. R. Jones, Hood and Anderson, leaving in front of Richmond the divisions of D. H. Hill and McLaws, and two brigades under J. G. Walker. The return of these troops for July 20th exists in the Archive Office at Washington, and is the nearest one extant to the date of the battle. But in addition to these commands of infantry, GeneGeneral Lee took two brigades (Drayton's and Evans'), recently arrived from South Corolina. The whole infantry force was organized, I believe, as follows: Longstreet's division.  Regts. Kemper's Brers and men6,117 Add-- Drayton's and Evans' brigades4,600   Total infantry taken by General Lee26,768 The cavalry, under General Stuart, consisted of two brigades under Hampton and Fit