Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 4, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for James K. Lee or search for James K. Lee in all documents.

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Military Works. We are indebted to West & Johnston for copies of the "Young Volunteer's Hand-Book," very neatly printed, from the Raleigh, N. C., press. They are now running Gilham's Tactics through the press of a Charleston publisher. The "Young Volunteer's Hand-Book," by our townsman, Capt. Jas. K. Lee, has had a great sale. The second edition is running off rapidly. Gilham will be ready by the 20th inst. Both books are handsomely printed, and will compare favorably with the text-books from the Northern cities.
Personal. --Among the arrivals in this city yesterday, were James K. Lee, of Company B, First Regiment, Manassas Junction; J. Packard, Jr., Fairfax; Thomas A. Ball, New York; Alexander W. Weddell, Petersburg; John B. Burton; First Regiment Arkansas Volunteers; Jos. L. King, Knoxville; S. W. Webb, Texas; Hon. Henry May, Baltimore; Jas. H. Skinner, Staunton; Cols. J. P. Adams and R. B. Boyleston, South Carolina; L. R. Starkey, Jackson, Mississippi; John Jordone, Orange; Mrs. J R. J. Love and five other ladies, Huntsville, Ala.; Richard Coke, Texas; W. G. Wright, Texas; S. M. Brown, Mississippi; W. H. Griffin, Jno. W. Massie, Ball; John R. Edmunds, Halifax; Jno. R. Bryan, Gloucester.
e Lighth Ward, and swivels had been placed in the windows of the houses in that Ward, the occupants swearing that they would defend it to the last gasp. Cannon had been planted in the principal streets and squares. A battery of brass field-pieces stands in Monument Square, in front of the residence of the Hon. Reverdy Johnson, and another one in Exchange Place, both being unlimbered, and ready for action. The city is full of Federal troops, and the population exasperated by these tyrannical and despotic measures. Notwithstanding the reign of terror existing there, portraits of President Davis, Gens. Beauregard and Lee were sold on the streets and greedily purchased. The Boston Flying Artillery and part of a Pennsylvania regiment were stationed in front of the Gilmore House, and a New York regiment in Exchange Place. It was felt in Baltimore that the slumbering volcano was about to burst forth, and that their devoted city would probably before many days be laid in ruins.
as just reached Washington, and is credited by many there, that in consequence of the difference of opinion existing between Jeff. Davis, General Beauregard and General Lee as to the policy upon which the war shall be conducted, General Lee has resigned his command in the rebel army. It is said that letters have been received fromGeneral Lee has resigned his command in the rebel army. It is said that letters have been received from Gen. Lee by some of his old associates which confirm this rumor. Miscellaneous. Four hundred volunteers, sick and disabled, were honorably discharged at Washington on Friday. Gen.Scott has issued positive orders that no reporters of the press shall hereafter, under any circumstances, visit the different encampments aGen. Lee by some of his old associates which confirm this rumor. Miscellaneous. Four hundred volunteers, sick and disabled, were honorably discharged at Washington on Friday. Gen.Scott has issued positive orders that no reporters of the press shall hereafter, under any circumstances, visit the different encampments at Washington. The City Treasurer of Philadelphia, it is stated, declines to pay the July interest on city loans held by parties in the seceded States, or by persons supposed to lack in loyalty to the Government and the Union.
d the string with the other, throwing the shot clear among the enemy. A five-second shell and two rounds of grape were then fired from the bow gun, while the after gun fired about the same quantity. "Slip the cable and start her," was now Lieut. Lee's order, on assuming the command. It was done, and soon the Freeborn and all the boats were out of the range of the deadly rifles and muskets. The Pawnee was now ordered alongside, and Dr. J. A. Moore, our surgeon, who had been sent on boahe back, perhaps passing through the liver and other vitals. The Captain was first laid on the quarter deck, but subsequently removed to a more convenient position. In removing him he said. "Why remove me? I am quite comfortable." Here Lieutenant Lee asked if he could do anything for him. He only said, "Raise my head a little higher." To Dr. Moore he once said, "Dr., the wound is here," pointing to the pit of his stomach. The Captain lingered for about three-quarters of an hour, when he